NAMING OF LAW & LEGAL CENTER, UO

Summary

The University of Oregon requests an exception to OAR 580-050-0025 regarding the naming of buildings after a living person. The OAR provides that an exception may be made if "the donor contributes a substantial share of construction or if other unusually meritorious reasons exist." The University wishes to name a building after living persons who qualify on both of the reasons cited.

Staff Report to the Board

Officials at the University of Oregon have forwarded to the Office of Finance and Administration a request to name the building currently housing the Law and Legal Center "Grayson Hall" in honor of Jeff and Susan Grayson. The Law and Legal Center was constructed in 1969 and has served the University well; however, the Law School has outgrown the facility and will move to the new Knight Law Center upon completion of Phase I construction of the Campus Development Project, which was approved by the Emergency Board in November 1996. Phase II of this project, involving the conversion of the Law and Legal Center into a classroom facility for the College of Arts and Sciences, is one of the top priority projects in the Board's 1997-1999 Capital Construction program. If approved, the Law and Legal Center will be renamed Grayson Hall.

The Graysons, both UO alumni and long-time Oregon residents, have long been associated with the University of Oregon. During their college days at UO, both were active in many student organizations. Mr. Grayson is currently chairman and CEO of Capital Consultants, Inc., an investment firm based in Portland, Oregon, which he founded in 1968. He has been active with the UO Foundation Board of Trustees for many years, serving as its president in 1994 and as its chairman in 1995. Mr. Grayson is also co-chair of the Oregon Campaign, the University's $200 million capital campaign.

The Graysons have committed $1.5 million to renovate the Law and Legal Center into classroom, office, and lecture space for the College of Arts and Sciences. The total cost of the project is estimated at $5.5 million.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Law and Legal Center building be renamed Grayson Hall in honor of Jeff and Susan Grayson, strong supporters of the University of Oregon.

BOARD ACTION:

AUTHORIZATION TO ALLOCATE ELSIE SILVER ESTATE TO THE THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT & UNDESIGNATED GIFTS, UO

Staff Report to the Board

The University of Oregon requests authorization to transfer $83,000 of the funds recently received from the Elsie Silver Estate to the Theatre Arts Department for immediate expenditure. The total bequest from the estate is $113,000 and is unrestricted. The University requests that the remainder of the bequest (approximately $30,000) remain undesignated, pending a decision by the President as to its use.

The University of Oregon has received a $250,000 private challenge gift to benefit the Theatre Arts Department, which requires matching gifts. By directing the Elsie Silver Estate bequest to theatre arts, the UO will make significant progress in meeting the match. Therefore, the President and his advisors have concluded that this proposal is the most productive and best use of these funds.

Pursuant to IMD 6.140(6), any individual donation or gift that exceeds $30,000 shall be designated a quasi-endowment. The Board must authorize any exceptions in excess of $100,000.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Board authorize use of $83,000 from the Elsie Silver Estate for the Theatre Arts Department and that the undesignated remainder be placed in an unrestricted gift fund at the University of Oregon.

BOARD ACTION:

INTERNAL MANAGEMENT DIRECTIVE ON ENDOWED CHAIRS

Executive Summary

Because of decreased levels of state general fund support for higher education, OSSHE has come to rely on outside sources of funds. Some of this support has come through donor's provision of endowments for faculty chairs. The Board's policy authorizing acceptance of gifts did not reference the receipt of endowed chairs. The proposed policy is designed to balance the interests of the donors in directing gifts with the interest of the Board in maintaining appropriate oversight over employment matters.

Staff Report to the Board

OSSHE institutions have been encouraged to seek external funding to support programs and to retain faculty. Support has included gifts for creation of endowed faculty chairs. Recently, a donor has indicated a desire to create such an endowment to provide support for the presidency of the University of Oregon. This has prompted the Board to review its policies to ensure that it has established adequate guidelines regarding receipt of gifts for this purpose.

The Board has guidelines governing institutions' receipt of gifts but has not developed guidelines specifically regarding the receipt of gifts for endowed chairs. The Board already has in place administrative rules and Internal Management Directives (IMDs) that establish procedures for receipt of outside compensation as well as compensation paid from an institution-recognized foundation.

Policy on receipt of gifts (OAR 580-042-0010)

The Board authorizes institutions to accept gifts that will not result in 1) enrollments beyond those in the budget approved by the Board; 2) commitments of funds beyond those in the budget approved by the Board; 3) commitment to continue support of a program if such funds are discontinued; 4) development or support of programs inconsistent with the institution mission; 5) launching of new curricular programs without Board approval; 6) capital outlay greater than $10,000; and 7) a client demand for noninstructional or nonresearch services greater than currently exists. The Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration is authorized to approve other gifts.

Policy on compensation paid by foundations (OAR 580-046-0035)

Foundations may pay salaries or other benefits to employees when approved by the Board for employees appointed by the Board or when approved by the president for institution employees. Unless the Chancellor authorizes otherwise, supplements are paid in accordance with normal institutional practice.

Policy on outside activities and related compensation (IMD 4.005 and 4.010)

The Board, pursuant to specific legislative authorization, requires each institution to have procedures by which institution officials, and the Chancellor, can review and approve receipt of compensation from outside sources or outside activities which create a potential conflict of interest. Those guidelines are designed to authorize faculty to engage in outside consulting or other activities as long as it does not substantially interfere with their institutional obligations and benefits the institution and the faculty member.

The proposed Internal Management Directive on Endowed Chairs is intended to guide institution presidents, the Chancellor, and the Board in consideration of gifts to endow chairs for faculty members and others. It is designed to balance the legitimate interests of the donors in directing gifts with the interest of the Board in maintaining appropriate oversight over employment matters.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff proposes the Board adopt the following Internal Management Directive:

4.020 Board Policy on Endowed Chairs

Institutions may accept gifts for endowed chairs consistent with the requirements of (1) - (4) of this directive. If an endowed chair is created for a Chancellor, president, or vice chancellor, the Board shall apply the same guidelines. If an endowed chair is created for a member of the Chancellor's staff or an institution vice president, provost, or comparable position, the Chancellor shall apply the same guidelines.

(1) The gift is consistent with the Board's policy on receipt of gifts contained in OAR 580-042-0010(1);

(2) The institution establishes the salary for the chair, selects the occupant of the chair, and makes decisions regarding the allocation of funds between salary and other types of educational, institutional, and professional support for use by the holder of the chair;

(3) Expenditures from endowed chair funds will be paid through institutional accounts, unless expressly authorized otherwise; and

(4) The Chancellor shall approve any exceptions to the above policy in writing. If the endowed chair is one authorized by the Chancellor or Board President, the Board President shall approve any exceptions.

BOARD ACTION:

B.S. IN COMPUTER SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS (JOINT MAJOR), WOU

Introduction

Western Oregon University (WOU) requests authorization to offer a new instructional program leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Computer Science and Mathematics (Joint Major). The Board reviewed a preliminary proposal for this program on October 18, 1996. This program will be offered through the Computer Science Division and the Mathematics Department in the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The program is designed specifically for students desiring a solid foundation in mathematics and in programming/language skills sought by high-technology industries -- and is most appropriate for students who would, at the present time, pursue a major in computer science and a minor in mathematics. This proposed degree is a combination of two current degrees, both of which are consistent with Western's mission and campus strategic plan. Although there are similar programs at the University of Oregon and Southern Oregon University, the proposed program is within the capacity of the institution to offer, is in response to growing needs in the high-tech sector of Oregon's economy, and provides a course of study appropriately situated between a community college preparation program and a more theoretically oriented research-university degree. No new resources are needed to implement the program.

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

The proposed program combining existing majors is wholly consistent with Western's recently adopted mission statement, approved by the Board at its September 20, 1996, meeting, which states, in part, that it is Western's aim to "prepare students to make personal and professional contributions to the economy, culture, and society of Oregon...[through its] core curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences [which] provides the foundation for excellence in degree programs in creative arts, natural sciences, mathematics, humanities, and social sciences, as well as in professional degree programs in teacher education, business, computer science, criminal justice, and fire service administration."

2. Evidence of Need

This program responds directly to identified market needs in the region. Students will need to be well prepared to enter Oregon's expanding computer technologies industries, with special strengths in micro applications for software and hardware. Over the past eight years, there have been nine Western students who have received the B.S. in Computer Science and the B.S. in Mathematics (double majors). This proposed program would therefore institutionalize a path that some students have undertaken on their own -- pursuing a program that affords fluency in the concepts and language of mathematics coupled with the ability to transform the mathematical form into one acceptable for a computer. Of those students who have pursued the double major and chosen to enter industry, all were hired prior to graduation and awarded salaries approximately 10 to 20 percent higher than their peers receiving B.S. degrees in computer science alone. Two of the students went on to earn master's degrees in computer science, and one is currently pursuing a doctorate in computer science.

National need for graduates of this program is indicated by the 1996-97 edition of the Occupational Outlook Handbook, which lists "computer scientists and systems analysts" as the fastest-growing field (in terms of number of projected openings) during the years 1994 to 2005. Further, the Oregon Occupational Projections Handbook (for the years 1996 to 2005) indicates that employment in the categories of computer systems analysis, computer science, and computer science teachers will remain high in the state with an accelerating ten-year job growth rate. Based on a projected growth rate of up to eight percent, as many as 440 positions in the state's software industry alone may be created annually. When the needs of other high-tech industries are considered, as well as the demand for high-tech employees in commercial businesses and government offices, as many as 800 to 1,200 positions in this field may be needed. In all OSSHE institutions, approximately 150 students graduated in computer science last year. Given the past history of graduates and projected trends in the industry, it is anticipated that the full-employment pattern of Western's computer science-degree holders will continue for the graduates of this joint-major degree.

In terms of the present computer science degree, Western is experiencing an increase of industry requests for its graduates and an increase of students in the current program (including entry-level students as well as increased transfers from the regional community colleges and four-year institutions). There are at least two major components that will make the proposed program's graduates attractive to prospective employers. First, the curriculum of this program fills a niche between the preparation of community college students for specific job categories and preparation of undergraduates at a research university, more of whom may be groomed for advanced degree programs. The purpose of the proposed Western program is to prepare students for the current workplace and for the pursuit of lifelong learning. Second, the liberal arts base of the program is responsive to corporations (e.g., Microsoft) that seek graduates having a breadth of knowledge, not only in computer science, but in other fields as well.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

The quality of the proposed program draws from established programs, both of which are long-standing at Western. The computer science degree program was established in 1984 and, to date, there have been approximately 220 graduates. Over 80 percent of the program's graduates remain in the Willamette Valley. Enrollment has been increasing steadily, with the current count at slightly over 100 majors and averaging over 25 graduates per year. Western's graduates are recruited to such major corporations as Intel, Nike, Symantec, Oracle, Sequent, and Hewlett Packard. Graduates also are employed in local software corporations, such as Penmetrics, Statware, CTR, ONCO, and Supra, each of which has multi-million-dollar revenues. For the past four years, placement has been above 95 percent before graduation.

Faculty hold requisite degrees to ensure instructional quality. In the computer science division, of the ten instructors, four have a Ph.D. in computer science, three have other terminal degrees, one has done doctoral-level work in computer science, one has an M.S. in computer science, and one is a graduate teaching assistant. These faculty are invited to consult in such areas as networking, systems design, systems analysis, parallel processing, and distance learning. The three mathematics department faculty hold Ph.D.s.

Finally, students in this program have the opportunity to participate in internships and practica as part of their educational experience. Typically, Western indicated there are more industry requests for internships than there are students available to fill them. Of the students in internship experiences, approximately 98 percent of them receive offers from the company in which they were placed.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

Faculty. No new funds for faculty are required to implement this proposed program. As stated above, ten FTE instructors in computer science and three FTE in mathematics are currently on the Western faculty. The current course offerings in computer science and mathematics are entirely sufficient to support the proposed program.

Library, Facilities, and Equipment. Over the previous three years, expenditures for library resources in computer science and mathematics have totaled approximately $9,000 per year. It is anticipated that additional acquisitions in these areas -- in the amount of $5,000 per year for the next three years -- will be needed, primarily in terms of periodicals. These costs will be jointly covered by the library and the office of the Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences for three years and eventually become a permanent fixture of the library budget. In addition, a variety of other resources available for multi-station student use are presently available (e.g., CD-ROM version of MS Developer Reference, Borland Desk Reference, Encarta Electronic Library, STATS 93, Bookshelf, Alternative Program Language, and Delphi).

Current computing facilities and equipment are sufficient to implement the program. With the dedicated technology fee, student computer resources are on a scheduled three-year replacement/upgrade schedule. Thus, the technology provided to all students (including those in the proposed program) will never be older than three years. Funds in the technology fee account have been approximately $255,000 per year for the last two years.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees as well as the Academic Council.

(Copies of the full proposal are available from the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Western Oregon University to establish a program leading to the B.S. in Computer Science and Mathematics effective fall term 1997. A follow-up review of the program will be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

BOARD ACTION:

B.S. IN AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE STUDIES - TEACHER EDUCATION, WOU

Introduction

Western Oregon University (WOU) requests authorization to offer a new instructional program leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in American Sign Language (ASL) Studies - Teacher Education. The Board reviewed a preliminary proposal for this program on October 18, 1996. This proposed degree will be housed in the Regional Resource Center on Deafness (RRCD), offered through the Division of Special Education in the School of Education, and will prepare graduates for employment in secondary and postsecondary school settings as ASL educators. Although at the present time no license is required to teach ASL, this proposed program is being developed in anticipation of TSPC approval of ASL as the Basic endorsement in Foreign Language Teaching. This ASL teacher education program is being requested at this time to meet the urgent demand for qualified ASL teachers in secondary and postsecondary settings in Oregon and the Northwest. The proposed program would be unique to this region of the country and require no new state resources to implement.

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

The preparation of professional educators has been central to Western's mission since its approval as a teacher training institution in 1882. Further, since the establishment of the RRCD in 1972, Western has come to be viewed as a major institution for the preparation of education, sign language interpretation, and vocational rehabilitation specialists focusing on individuals who are hard of hearing or deaf. Thus, the establishment of this proposed ASL teacher education program would be entirely consistent with Western's institutional identity and long-term mission. The proposed program has as its primary goals to: (1) meet the growing need for ASL educators who desire to focus on secondary and postsecondary classrooms; (2) ensure that students who choose ASL in order to meet second language requirements are afforded professional, high-quality instruction comparable to other languages; and (3) assist in creating a more supportive and accessible environment for native users of ASL.

2. Evidence of Need

This ASL teacher education program is being requested at the present time to meet the urgent demand for qualified ASL teachers in secondary and postsecondary settings throughout Oregon and the Northwest. Several events have contributed to the development of this need, including the national recognition of ASL as a language, enormous popularity of ASL courses (it has become the fourth most commonly studied language in the country), and the demand for higher ASL language competency among students applying to counselor-, teacher-, and interpreter for the deaf-preparation programs. Further, in 1995, the Oregon Legislature passed SB 475 which (1) recognizes ASL as a language that meets second language requirements in high schools and higher education institutions; (2) encourages the development of K-12 ASL school curricula; and (3) encourages the State Board of Education to coordinate with the State Board of Higher Education to implement programs that "prepare qualified teachers of American Sign Language." Over the last five years, in an effort to address the quality of ASL instruction, the RRCD has offered week-long workshops for practicing ASL teachers. Through contact with these in-service professionals, it has become clear that specific, professional preparation in ASL teaching is nonexistent among the approximately 150 individuals hired to teach ASL in secondary and postsecondary settings in Alaska, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Thus, this proposed program will address the current, specific educational needs of those individuals desiring positions in ASL teaching.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

This proposed program builds on a rich tradition of teacher education at Western and the work of the RRCD. The RRCD was created to meet the demand for qualified professionals throughout the Northwest who work, in a variety of education and social service settings, with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. At the present time, the RRCD maintains M.S. degree programs in "teacher preparation: deaf education," and "rehabilitation counseling: deafness"; a B.S. program in ASL/English interpretation; and three federally funded programs for currently employed professional counselors and interpreters who serve hard of hearing or deaf individuals. Students accepted into the ASL teacher education program will complete a 63-credit ASL major as their subject area, as well as a 42-credit secondary education professional core. This secondary education core, approved by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), provides students with a solid foundation in pedagogy that is supported by developmental psychology and learning theory. The secondary education faculty sets rigorous entrance requirements and maintains high academic standards throughout the student experience. A maximum of 18 students will be enrolled in each of the sophomore, junior, and senior levels; this class size will ensure adequate individual instruction, monitoring, and evaluation. Specific program objectives have been set forth for all students in the areas of ASL, deaf culture, deaf history, ASL literature, linguistics, and pedagogy. Finally, the resident faculty who will teach in this proposed program are all highly experienced in the ASL field.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

Faculty. Core faculty are presently on board. Each of the three current staff members has many years of experience in interpreting and in the ASL-education field. All have served in the interpreter training program at Western in such positions as coordinator for the Region X interpreter education center; coordinator for the RRCD summer interpreter education program; and coordinator of the "teacher education: deaf education" program.

Current faculty resources are sufficient to implement the proposed program. One of the current faculty positions is supported with campus-based funding; the other two are primarily supported through federal grant dollars. These federal funds have been a fixture of Western's resource picture since the mid-1970s and this condition is not expected to change. Further, Western will seek additional federal and other grant funds to build and maintain the program at an appropriate instructional level in the coming years. An additional 0.67 FTE instructional staff is desired the first year of operation, with an increase in additional FTE to 1.17 in the second and third years when the full course of study will be offered. Rank for new faculty will be at the assistant professor level or above. In the event that the expected new external grant funds are not forthcoming, Western will internally reallocate resources to support the program at the necessary level. In the unlikely event that federal funding is withdrawn in the future, students currently in the program would be guaranteed program offerings through graduation.

Library, Facilities, and Equipment. Over the past several years, Western has added heavily to its library holdings in American Sign Language research, teaching, and interpreting. Combined with the materials purchased with several federal grants, the campus has become one of the strongest schools in the West in terms of its collection of ASL, deaf education, and ASL/English interpretation instructional media. No additional financial support is required for additional materials. With regard to routine upgrading of current reference sources, requests will be made through Western's ongoing acquisition process.

With respect to facilities and equipment, the following are in place: accessible office space in the Education Building; videotaping and other media services; duplicating services; computer, printer, and related repair/support services; adequate and accessible classrooms; standard office supplies; and telecommunication devices for the deaf (TTYs). In addition, the School of Education is presently exploring the design and the resources necessary to develop an interactive, multimedia, computer classroom teaching environment. This educational technology, when implemented, will serve as a language laboratory for all students and assist in keeping Western at the national forefront of ASL studies.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees as well as the Academic Council.

(Copies of the full proposal are available from the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Western Oregon University to establish a program leading to the B.S. in American Sign Language Studies - Teacher Education effective fall term 1997. A follow-up review of the program will be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

BOARD ACTION:

CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE, PSU

Introduction

Portland State University (PSU) requests authorization to establish the Criminal Justice Policy Research Institute. This organization would be affiliated with the School of Government in the College of Urban and Public Affairs and would engage in applied research activities for the purposes of enhancing the effectiveness of Oregon's corrections programs as well as providing policy makers with assistance in decision making. Among the goals of the proposed institute are: (1) the development of the capacity to collect, analyze, and disseminate information to meet the emerging needs of the adult and juvenile criminal justice system in Oregon; (2) collaboration with the legislature, and state and local public service agencies, to inform policy, identify program areas in need of development, and locate funding sources to enable the implementation and evaluation of needed programs; (3) serving as an ongoing source of information and technical assistance to law enforcement and corrections agencies; and (4) serving as a provider of program evaluation services for state and local law enforcement and corrections agencies whose programs require outside evaluations in order to meet funding criteria. The Institute will be directed by a (to-be-appointed) senior professor in the Division of Administration of Justice and will employ a graduate research assistant to assist with research activities of the Institute.

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

This proposed organization would be directly related to PSU's urban mission by engaging in applied research on significant social problems and providing information and technical assistance to state and local government agencies. The Institute has been operating on an informal basis to date and has a number of research projects completed or in progress. The research investigations of the Institute have assessed and evaluated strategies related to such relevant community/regional issues as gang intervention and prevention, a juvenile diversion program, domestic violence, substance abuse, correctional institution expansion, and satisfaction with state police.

2. Evidence of Need

The Oregon Department of Corrections has observed the need for a statewide, university-based research institute with the capacity to provide objective analyses, contract research, program evaluation, and serve as a data repository for criminal justice agencies. Significant public policy changes dealing with juvenile offenders, sentencing guidelines, and prison construction -- and the Governor's agenda on how to manage these changes -- make apparent the need for such an institute. Letters of support attesting to the need for the proposed Institute are on file from the Portland chief of police, the Multnomah County sheriff, the Multnomah County district attorney, and the Marion County district attorney.

The goals and activities of this Institute are perceived to be complementary to the UO Institute on Violence and Destructive Behavior established in 1995. The mission of the UO entity is to empower schools and social service agencies to address violence and destructive behavior -- at school entry and beyond -- in order to ensure the safety of children and youth, as well as to facilitate their academic achievement and social development.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

The proposed Institute will build on the work of the informal organization presently in place and will continue to be guided by an advisory board composed of ten members representing a wide range of law enforcement and criminal justice professionals in the state and community. A senior professor with an established research record and prior experience in the field will be sought to provide the leadership and coordination of the proposed Institute.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

PSU has established the proposed Institute as an institutional priority and intends to internally reallocate funds from within the College of Urban and Public Affairs toward the Institute when such funds become available. The University and the College recognize their responsibility in securing the funding to make the proposed Institute a vital organization. Staff to be added include one FTE senior professor to direct the Institute and one part-time graduate research assistant to assist in the ongoing evaluation and research activities. A service and supplies budget will also be provided for. In the first full year of activities, the internal reallocation needed is expected to be $166, 640. The informal Institute currently in place has attracted a wide range of research and evaluation projects. Its formalization of status as a Board-recognized institute will enhance the organization's ability to attract external funds and to engage in a wider range of activities in support of criminal justice policy research.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees as well as the Academic Council.

(Copies of the full proposal are available from the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Portland State University to establish the Center for Criminal Justice, effective spring term 1997.

BOARD ACTION:

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY COUNCIL

Summary of Executive Committee Meeting (March 21, 1997)

Chancellor Cox announced the membership of the Engineering and Technology Industry Council. (A list was provided to the Board.) Two people will be added to the Council: a representative from the metallurgics industry and perhaps an Intel representative. Currently, the Council is developing an open RFP process that welcomes proposals from public, private, and even out-of-state providers regarding offering programs in graduate and professional continuing education in engineering.

Referring to the December 20, 1996, minutes of the Board meeting, Dr. Aschkenasy pointed out that the language related to the reporting structure of the Engineering and Technology Industry Council was ambiguous. Therefore, he asked for a motion to add the statement: "The Oregon College of Engineering and Computer Science will be guided and advised by an Engineering and Technology Industry Council that reports to the Chancellor."

Executive Committee Action

Mr. Swanson moved to approve the clarifying language as presented. Those voting in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none. The item will be placed on the consent agenda at the regular Board meeting in April for action by the full Board.

BOARD ACTION:

MASTER OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE OR CONDUCTING, PSU

Introduction

Portland State University requests authorization to offer the Master of Music (M.M.) in Performance or Conducting. The Board reviewed a preliminary proposal for this program on May 9, 1996. Both of these proposed specializations emphasize students' development -- and expression of individual talents -- at a professional level. Performance focuses on competency in the communication of music through the medium of vocal performance or the major instrument; conducting focuses on the development of the skilled professional in choral or instrumental conducting. Currently, students interested in graduate work in music at PSU pursue either the MAT or MST. However, high interest now exists on the part of many students who have goals most appropriately satisfied by pursuit of a performance or conducting degree rather than an education degree. This proposed program would complement the existing Master of Music program at the University of Oregon by serving a population of talented, largely placebound, students in the Portland metropolitan area. The proposed degree is directly related to the urban mission of PSU by serving the vital arts community flourishing throughout the metropolitan area. No new resources are sought to implement this program. Present faculty members now utilized in delivering the MAT/MST degrees will be involved in the M.M. offerings. An internal reallocation of existing funds will be used to strengthen library holdings for this program, primarily musical scores.

(The full program proposal and external review are on file in the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

The proposed program is directly related to PSU's urban mission. A professional program in the arts enjoys tremendous benefits from the diverse cultural influences of an urban center, and, conversely, the metropolitan area is the richer for its public higher education provider offering high-level programs in the arts. The institution's position as a primary influence in the city will be enhanced by the students in the arts who live and study there. Program graduates will add considerably to the quality of Portland's cultural life.

2. Evidence of Need

Portland State University has attracted an exceptional faculty -- both in number and prestige -- in the performing arts. Consequently, the number of highly qualified students in all music degree programs has increased significantly over the past decade. Approximately 40 students each year request information about graduate degrees in performance offered by the music department. Many of these students ultimately pursue graduate work in music at PSU via the teaching degrees, although their preferred option would be the M. M. Some students have left PSU programs when they felt their career options were limited without having the M.M. available. The Department of Music believes that it cannot continue to attract the best students without the proposed degree offerings. In terms of employment, an individual committed to a career as a professional performer should seek a degree program of distinction. Positions in every field of music are highly competitive and only those among the most qualified have the best chance for securing a position or creating a successful life in the performing arts. This program will better offer gifted and qualified graduates that chance.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

The proposed program is assured to be of high quality. All participating faculty members are recognized as expert performers and teachers in their specialized area and are regarded as leaders in the community, regionally, nationally, and in some cases, internationally. The resumes of music department faculty members are replete with references to performances, compositions, and recordings to their credit. Further, high levels of student success at the undergraduate level reflect the quality of present programs at PSU. Among recent honors attained are the 1992 and 1993 First Place prizes, National Association of Teachers of Singing competition; the 1994 Second Place, Portland Youth Philharmonic Concerto competition; and the 1995 First Place, National Metropolitan Opera competition.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

Faculty. No new funds are sought in order to implement this proposed new program. The faculty members currently involved in delivery of the MAT and MST degrees would be the same individuals to provide instruction for the M.M. degrees. An integral part of the instructional mission of the proposed program would be carried out by involving adjunct faculty members who are leaders in Portland's major musical organizations. Reassignment of present faculty will be made to accommodate the one new course in the curriculum.

Library, Facilities, and Equipment. The present music holdings of the PSU library represent a high-quality collection. The Audio-Visual Services section of the library contains the collection of scores and recordings needed for research. With the rise of the CD as the recording standard, the Audio-Visual unit began building a complete collection several years ago. Weaker areas in both book and recording collections are being reviewed in consultation with faculty members in each specialty; an additional $2,000 per year has been reallocated from existing library funds to enhance these areas, primarily for the purchase of performance scores.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees, the Academic Council, and by an on-site external review team. The external review was conducted by Thomas Cook, chair of the Department of Music at the University of Montana, and Richard Evans, chair of the Department of Music at Whitworth College, who visited the PSU campus on December 3, 1996. The positive review found that "much of the proposed curricular content is already in place;" that "increased enrollments in graduate music students should be expected as a consequence of adding these highly attractive options;" that the faculty have "definitive professional achievement in creative activity and proven teaching expertise;" and that PSU "can be proud of the stature of this department's reputation in the state and region -- a prestige assured to be even further enhanced" once this program is implemented.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Board authorize Portland State University to establish a program leading to the Master of Music in Performance or Conducting effective fall term 1997, with a follow-up review of the program to be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

Board Discussion and Action (February 21, 1997)

Dr. Aschkenasy indicated he had recently attended a concert of the Oregon Symphony that had a student conductor from Pacific University, and he wondered why PSU didn't have a program like that. Dr. Stanford, department chair, explained that Pacific had a specific agreement with the Symphony as a result of an arrangement with a benefactor.

Ms. Christopher moved and Mr. Swanson seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, Swanson, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

BOARD ACTION:

EMERGING SMALL BUSINESS/MINORITY & WOMEN BUSINESS ENTERPRISE CONTRACTS

Staff Report to the Board

Oregon Administrative Rules (OARs) 580-050-0041 and 580-050-0042 require the Board to annually review the effects of these rules as they relate to the prior calendar year's participation by emerging small business enterprises (ESBs) and minority or women business enterprises (M/WBEs) contractors and subcontractors in capital improvement projects. OAR 580-050-0041 states that successful bidders for public improvement projects approved by the Board shall make good faith efforts to "meet the project's goals for subcontracting with or obtaining materials to be used in performing the contract from emerging small businesses." OAR 580-050-0042 deals with similar requirements for businesses owned by minorities and women. All such businesses must be certified by the State of Oregon's Office of Minority, Women and Emerging Small Businesses. Successful bidders for capital improvement projects must make "good faith efforts" to hire ESBs and M/WBEs as subcontractors or themselves be certified by the State of Oregon as ESBs, MBEs, or WBEs. Evidence of "good faith efforts" may include taking such actions as attending pre-bid meetings to inform emerging small businesses of contracting or subcontracting opportunities, identifying economically feasible units of the project that can be subcontracted to these enterprises, or advertising in selected publications.

1996 M/WBE and ESB Contract Participation Levels

During 1996, contracts were awarded for 26 capital improvement projects with a total value of $24,360,185. Successful bidders on these contracts projected that about $2,482,149 of that amount (10.2 percent) would be for work performed by M/WBEs and ESBs. Of this total, the projected M/WBE participation rate was 8 percent; the projected rate for ESBs was 2.2 percent.

Of the 26 projects awarded in 1996, only one prime contract was awarded to a firm with both M/WBE & ESB certification. This firm was awarded a contract for $299,000 for a project at Oregon State University representing 15 percent of the M/WBE contracting projected and over half of the total ESB contracting projected in 1996.

Prime contracts awarded to M/WBE certified contractors in 1996 accounted for three of the 26 capital improvement projects. These three prime contracts, two at OSU and one at the University of Oregon, totaled $1,407,747 and represented almost three-fourths of the total contracts amount projected for M/WBE firms during 1996.

Historical Profile of ESB and M/WBE Projected Participation Levels

The percentage of M/WBE and ESB participation projected in each year since the rules were adopted in late 1990 are as follows:

Year
Total Value Capital Improv. Projects Total # Projects Project Avg. Value Amount of Participation Percent of Participation
1996* $24,360,185 26 $936,930 $2,482,149 10.2%
1995* 15,226,612 20 761,330 1,533,392 10.1%
1994 31,367,051 36 871,307 6,825,232 21.8%
1993 11,890,000 28 424,643 3,863,000 32.5%
1992 7,742,242 25 309,690 692,084 8.9%
1991 54,633,164 41 1,332,516 1,747,827 3.2%
1990 120,000,000 NA NA 1,680,000 1.4%

* The information provided for 1996 does not include any construction contracting information for Oregon Health Sciences University. The 1995 information includes several months of OHSU data prior to the passage of legislation that granted public corporation status to the University effective July 1, 1995.

Interpretation of 1996 Participation Levels

Under the provisions of the Higher Education Administrative Efficiency Act, each campus continues to facilitate its own construction contract and review of contract insurance requirements. The OSSHE institutions will continue to report each project to the Chancellor's Office using a single contract award form. The Chancellor's Office Administration Division will continue to report Emerging Small Business and Minority/Women Business contracting annually to the Board.

(No Board action required)

PRELIMINARY PROPOSALS FOR NEW ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

The Academic Council has favorably reviewed the following eight preliminary proposals for new academic programs proposed by Oregon State University (OSU), Portland State University (PSU), Southern Oregon University (SOU), and the University of Oregon (UO).

OSU proposes a master's degree in applied physics, aimed at preparing scientists for the burgeoning electronics, computer, and optics industries in the state of Oregon.

PSU proposes four new programs: one baccalaureate, a master's degree, a doctoral program, and the addition of a fourth specialization area to their Doctor of Education (Ed.D.). The baccalaureate program recognizes the academic field of women's studies as a mature area of scholarship and replaces the undergraduate certificate with the degree program. The master's degree would provide training in the theory and practice of conflict resolution. The proposed doctoral program in mathematics education would prepare individuals to train future elementary- and secondary-education mathematics teachers. Finally, the Ed.D. would include a specialty area to train educational leaders in a hybrid field of counselor and special education.

SOU proposes a degree in language and culture at the baccalaureate level that is responsive to Oregon's high profile in the international commerce and trade arena.

UO proposes two new baccalaureate degree programs. With the addition of these majors, students would receive liberal arts degrees in the fields of women's studies and ethnic studies. These degree programs would recognize the areas as mature areas of scholarship, better prepare students for the changing environment of the work world, and are consistent with UO's commitment to provide education based upon diversity and excellence.

These preliminary proposals are outlined below and explained in greater detail in the supplementary section of the Board's docket. (Copies of the supplementary sections are available upon request from the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

OSU -- M.S. in Applied Physics

This proposed program would prepare students at the master's degree level in physics with an emphasis on its practical applications, especially those related to work in industry. Students with an undergraduate degree in physics or a closely related area (e.g., mathematics, engineering, computer science) would be served. At the present time, a master's in applied physics is offered by the Oregon Graduate Institute, and the Board reviewed a preproposal for a complementary UO program on October 18, 1996; the proposed UO program would lead to a master's degree in applied science. The provosts of OSU and UO are working with campus departments regarding possible collaborative efforts. Graduates would be prepared for employment in Oregon's growing electronics, computer, and optics industries. The program will be developed through close cooperation with the companies that would hire its graduates. A program of this nature is consistent with the land-grant mission of OSU, which is the leading OSSHE institution in applied science programs. The program will be structured so that a B.S. in physics and the M.S. in applied physics can be completed in five years. Similarly, students in other undergraduate majors in science and engineering, as well as students enrolled at other OSSHE institutions and community college programs, will be able to complete the master's degree in a fifth year. Because this proposed program is the elevation of a current concentration area in the M.S. program to a full degree program, all resources to offer the program are already in place.

PSU -- Baccalaureate Degree in Women's Studies; Revise Existing Certificate Program to be Post-baccalaureate Only

This proposed program would lead to the baccalaureate degree in women's studies, replacing the current undergraduate certificate program in the field. The certificate program would remain in place at the post-baccalaureate level. Women's studies, as an interdisciplinary field with a focus on women and the understanding of gender as a dimension of the human experience, draws from such areas as anthropology, black studies, fine arts, history, literature, philosophy, political science, psychology, science, and sociology. As a field of scholarship, women's studies has matured greatly over the past two decades, with sufficient breath and depth in the field now to fully support an undergraduate course of study. Nationally, undergraduate majors in women's studies have been available since the early 1980s, evolving from programs begun in the 1970s. This PSU program will place a high priority on community-campus partnerships and significant features of the certificate program, such as integration of students' life experience into the classroom and collaborative pedagogy, will continue. Graduates will pursue a variety of academic and professional goals, including graduate school and employment in health and human services areas (such as counseling, community health, and social work). Further, the curriculum provides core general education skills. No new resources are needed to implement this new program since it utilizes faculty from a variety of departments and programs within the University; administration of the program will continue to be handled by the current 1.0 FTE tenure-track faculty member (appointed 0.33 FTE as program coordinator) and a 0.7 FTE office specialist.

PSU -- M.A. in Conflict Resolution

This proposed master's degree program would provide students with the opportunity to gain mastery of the principles, insights and techniques for resolving conflict. Each student would tailor a degree program specific to their interests and needs, leading to an understanding of the various kinds of conflict (psychological, interpersonal, social, and global) as well as the development of a specialty area (e.g., family, organization, environment, human services/education, intercultural/international). Students in this program will be well grounded in both theory and practice, from an exploration of the deepest philosophical issues to hands-on practical applications of conflict resolution. Courses in the departments of philosophy, speech communication, sociology, psychology, international studies, political science, counseling, education, social work, and urban studies will be available to students enrolled in the program. This degree program is consistent with the urban mission of PSU -- as professional communities, neighborhood associations, and families increasingly turn to mediation and conflict resolution professionals to settle disputes. It is anticipated that graduates of the program will find positions as mediators, arbitrators, and violence-prevention specialists; many, however, will be applying this skill to their current professions. Half of the (approximately $85,000) yearly budget for the program will come from state funds and the remainder from private gifts and grants. The University of Oregon offers a graduate-level specialization in this area in its Master of Interdisciplinary Studies program. The two institutions expect to continue their collaborations as planning proceeds.

PSU -- Ph.D. in Mathematics Education

This proposed degree program would prepare individuals at the doctoral level so that they might train prospective math teachers in elementary- and secondary-education settings. Students would take coursework in both mathematics and pedagogy; degree candidates would write a thesis in mathematics education, conducting their research largely in area school systems. Although OSU currently offers a Ph.D. in mathematics education, the proposed program would be different in emphasis and provide a balance between study in mathematics and education. While most doctoral programs in mathematics education are structured to emphasize coursework in pure mathematics with a mathematics education-focused thesis to conclude the degree requirements, the coursework for this degree also includes considerable math pedagogy content.

Training individuals to perform research in mathematics pedagogy is increasingly important in our current era of educational reform. This proposed program is an attempt to understand how to increase access to mathematics in K-16 education. This program is closely aligned with key elements of PSU's mission, which requires work on a nationwide urban agenda as well as addressing the specific needs of Oregon's urban communities. A consistent issue in metropolitan communities across the country is the need to promote K-16 education reform, particularly in mathematics education. PSU has five faculty members in mathematics and one in education well positioned to mentor graduate students in this proposed program. Review of the faculty members' collective record of research, publication, and professional outreach to mathematics educators suggests they demonstrate the requisite qualifications to offer a doctoral program, in addition to the master's programs already established. Employment prospects for doctoral graduates in mathematics education are very good (in contrast to mathematics per se); for example, according to the American Mathematical Society, vacancies for 54 tenure-track positions in mathematics education existed at American colleges and universities in December 1996. Interest in this proposed Ph.D. program on the part of prospective students is high. No new faculty are needed to implement this new degree program provided the program size remains relatively small, as presently planned; PSU has placed a high priority on initiating this program and, in recent faculty replacements, has hired strategically to enhance the area of mathematics education. Other resources will be needed, however, to provide support to the program's graduate students and to acquire library resources.

PSU -- Special Education/Counselor Education (fourth specialization) in the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

This proposed program would lead to the addition of a fourth specialization area in the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree. Currently the specialization areas are Educational Administration, Postsecondary Education, and Curriculum & Instruction. Students enrolled in this program will gain an understanding of the complete lifelong needs of children and youth and have opportunities to learn about special and counselor education services offered in neighborhood schools as well as in the community. It is estimated that this combination of special- and counselor-education emphases will allow graduates to work in a greater variety of leadership positions than if they specialized in either field separately. Graduates will be employed as special-/counselor-education school district administrators; in community agencies that directly serve children, youth and adults with mental health needs; for private agencies/companies as leaders knowledgeable about clients with special needs; or go into private practice in the community. The program is consistent with the mission of PSU to focus on degree programs that serve the intellectual and professional needs of the community. The implementation of this program would require no new faculty or other resources, as the department intends to shift current resources to meet the demands of this specialization area.

SOU -- B.A. in Language and Culture with Concentrations in French, German, and Spanish

This proposed program would enable students to pursue one of three options leading to a baccalaureate degree in language and culture. Students majoring in this area would focus on practical language skills, in-depth study of cultures, as well as international/intercultural communication. Essential components of this program's curriculum would include core courses in the language of concentration, an interdisciplinary course on language and culture offered jointly by the Foreign Languages and Anthropology departments, and required courses in history. The degree program will also require a practicum and/or internship, with participation in a study-abroad program as a highly recommended component. This proposed program is consistent with a central element of SOU's mission, that is, preparing students to "be successful in a global society" -- especially important as Oregon's economy is increasingly dependent on international trade. The proposed program represents a collaboration with the OSSHE-sponsored study-abroad exchange programs in Germany, France, Ecuador, and Mexico, and complements the efforts of the SOU internship program, the OSSHE "Global Graduates" International Internship Program, and the International Cooperative Education Program. SOU estimates that the maximum need for additional instructional staff may amount to no more than 0.33 FTE, which would be accommodated with part-time faculty. The need for additional library and media resources will be addressed, in part, by the Discipline-Based Language Study Grant, which will provide for the acquisition of $10,000 of new, non-literary foreign language material. An additional $1,500 to $2,000 per year in the library budget for this program would have to be allocated, depending on the library director's resources survey.

UO -- B.A. in Women's Studies

This proposed program would lead to the B.A. in women's studies, supplementing the current undergraduate certificate and minor programs in this area. As described in the PSU preproposal in this area, women's studies is a flourishing interdisciplinary academic field with a focus on women and the understanding of gender as a dimension of the human experience. Women's studies is now considered a mature area of scholarship and has been an established program at UO since 1976. Student demand is high for an academic major program in this area at UO. Although a similar program is simultaneously being proposed by PSU, the apparent duplication of programs is deemed justified by the different student populations being served on the two campuses. This proposed program is consistent with the UO's mission to engage in interdisciplinary and collaborative undergraduate education. Modest additional resources are needed to implement this new program, both in personnel and library holdings. Personnel needs include a 0.5 FTE office coordinator (approximately $12, 960/year) and resources to support peer advising. Library needs include a one-time expenditure of $5,000 to fill existing gaps in the women's studies collection; a recurring $2,500 increase in the monograph budget; and a recurring $500-$1,000 increase in the serials budget.

UO -- B.A./B.S. in Ethnic Studies

This proposed program would lead to baccalaureate degrees in ethnic studies, an interdisciplinary field devoted to the investigation of the social, cultural, and historical construction -- and experience -- of ethnicity. Students in this program would be prepared for eventual employment in an increasingly culturally diverse world. Many businesses are now seeking employees who are sensitive to issues of cultural diversity, even in an era where downsizing is pervasive. The UO is the only Pacific-10 institution that does not offer a major in ethnic studies. At the present time, faculty in literature, English, history, international studies, law, and theater arts are represented in the ethnic studies area. This proposed major in ethnic studies would complement existing university curricular efforts in this area and intellectually link the disparate but growing number of courses on race, ethnicity, cultural diversity, and discrimination. It is anticipated that a minimum of three full-time faculty (one of whom would be program director) would be required to fully establish the ethnic studies program. In addition, increases in staff and GTF support would be required.

(No Board action required)

STATUS REPORT ON OSSHE'S RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN THE EDUCATION PROFESSIONS

Market for K-12 Educators

Oregon school districts annually employ 51,000 personnel. Teachers make up the largest number, about 26,500; administrators, 2,500; library/media specialists, 600; guidance/counseling and other professional personnel, 3,000.

The 32,000 professional personnel employed by public school districts must be licensed by the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC), an independent commission appointed by the Governor. TSPC issues three types of licenses: Teaching, Personnel Service, and Administrative. TSPC also issues a Basic and Standard license (Basic is the entry license; Standard is required once an educator has been employed for five years and meets continuing licensing requirements).

TSPC sets the minimum standards for, and approves programs at, institutions of higher education in 42 licensure "endorsement" areas: 36 fields in Teaching, 4 in Personnel Services, and 2 in Administrative. No institution prepares individuals in all 42 areas.

About 1,500 new educators complete preparation programs at Oregon's public and independent institutions each year. Of these, about 1,300 seek an Oregon license from TSPC. About an equal number (1,200) move annually to Oregon from other states.

The majority of newly prepared educators obtain employment in an Oregon public school during the year following college graduation (about 62 percent). New educators are also employed in Oregon's private K-12 schools, other sectors including education related, and as substitute teachers in public schools.

TSPC annually surveys school districts to assess the adequacy of the size of the pool of licensed applicants for employment openings. From these data, TSPC has identified the following shortage areas for 1997: Handicapped Learner, Hearing-Impaired, Severely Handicapped Learner, Speech-Impaired, Visually-Impaired, Counselor, School Psychologist, Foreign Languages, Technology Education, and Superintendent.

Preparation Programs

Six OSSHE universities offer educator preparation programs approved by TSPC in a variety of locations throughout the state:

Eastern Oregon University Four- and fifth-year programs for teachers; programs at Central Oregon University Center, Bend; collaborates with Oregon Institute of Technology in professional/technical program.

Oregon State University Fifth-year programs for teachers; counselors; advanced degree programs for workforce education specialists, community college teaching and administration.

Portland State University Fifth-year programs for teachers; counselors; administrators (principals/superintendents); speech-language pathologists.

Southern Oregon University Fifth-year programs for teachers.

Western Oregon University Four-year programs for teachers; programs in school districts by contract; cooperative professional/technical program with Chemeketa Community College.

University of Oregon Five-year program (K-8 elementary/special education) for teachers; fifth-year programs for teachers; administrators (principals/superintendents); school psychologists; speech-language pathologists.

Eleven independent institutions offer educator preparation programs (up from nine within the last two years). Six institutions offer four-year programs only; four offer both four- and fifth-year programs; and one offers only fifth-year programs.

In addition to programs leading to licensure (these are typically reported as "certificates" by OSSHE institutions), OSSHE institutions offer master's and doctoral degrees that meet the advanced professional needs of educators, individuals working in human service agencies, and business/industry. In 1995-96, over 2,100 degrees were awarded in education by OSSHE campuses. The actual number of degrees awarded to educators is higher since many educators complete advanced degrees in disciplines such as English, history, biology, etc., which are not reflected in the counts of "education" degrees awarded.

Recent Major Changes in Educator Preparation

There has been declining growth in enrollments in the public educator preparation programs over the past ten years compared to significant enrollment growth at the independent institutions. A decade ago, OSSHE institutions prepared 85 percent of the new educators in Oregon; that has dropped to about 50 percent today.

In 1994-95, public and independent institutions prepared about the same number of Elementary teachers who received an Oregon license after completing preparation programs (48 percent public institutions, 52 percent independent). Public institutions prepared about the same number of Secondary teachers who received an Oregon license (51 percent public institutions, 49 percent independent).

There were some notable differences by specialty areas, however. Public institutions prepared the majority (more than 60 percent) of the following specialties: Professional/Technical (70 percent), Physical Education/Health (65 percent), Fine Arts (70 percent), Special Education and Hearing-/Visually-/Speech-Impaired (85 percent). And independent institutions prepared the majority of the following specialities: Counselor/Psychologist (78 percent), Language Arts (66 percent), and Social Studies (60 percent).

Public institutions typically enroll a higher percentage of students who receive an Oregon license than the independent institutions. In 1994-95, 89 percent of OSSHE students received an Oregon license compared to 76 percent of independent institution students. The rise in independent education program enrollments began in the late 1980s, prior to Measure 5 cutbacks. In the mid-1980s, OSSHE institutions were asked by the Legislature to respond to the problem of an oversupply of educators (particularly teachers) in the state and simultaneous calls for higher standards. OSSHE institutions agreed to restrict enrollments by about one-third.

Simultaneously, OSSHE developed plans to move from four- to fifth-year programs in order to meet several needs. First, there was a need to attract more diverse people into the teaching profession (baccalaureate-holders, second/third-career people) and a rigorous, one-year program was the preferred option to meet these needs. Also, many students wanting to become teachers were "late deciders," making the decision to enter a preparation program often in their senior year in college. A post-baccalaureate model was preferable for these students.

Campuses were also asked to raise standards in order to improve the "products" of these programs. This included requiring a college major in the subject areas to be taught; passing a basic skills test for admission; passing the National Teachers Examination (NTE) in subject and pedagogy for licensure; completing a longer practicum in the schools (moving from 10 to a minimum of 15 weeks of full-time teaching); and submitting higher GPAs for admission to preparation programs. These changes resulted in fewer students being admitted to OSSHE institutions. Many of these students thereafter sought and gained admission at growing independent institution programs.

Measure 5 cutbacks brought major changes to teacher preparation programs in the public sector. In 1991, endorsement programs were eliminated at several OSSHE institutions, and reorganization within Colleges of Education occurred at many institutions. OSSHE adopted a Coordinated Plan that called for campuses to differentiate and work together to share programming as feasible, anticipating the advent of telecommunications options. However, investment resources in technology were unavailable to pursue the latter course, and major changes in school reform have dictated regional solutions.

The onset of the Educational Act for the 21st Century carried major implications for the preparation of new educators and the retraining of existing educators. The Joint Boards of Education developed an Action Plan on Redesigning Teacher Preparation and Licensure in collaboration with TSPC. The plan included a common policy and procedure to realign teacher licensure and teacher preparation programs with reforms called for in the Educational Act for the 21st Century. The Oregon Department of Education, in its oversight of school reform federal grant programs (Goals 2000, School-to-Work), asked higher education institutions to partner with schools in their regions to assist them in responding to the components of Oregon's school improvement plans.

Since these developments, OSSHE institutions have played a major role in assisting TSPC and the Oregon Department of Education in determining what changes should be made within the licensing requirements, preservice programs, and professional development opportunities for current educators.

Also, OSSHE developed the Proficiency-based Admission Standards System (PASS) in response to the Educational Act for the 21st Century. PASS carries unique responsibilities for the Colleges of Education, which must prepare educators (particularly high school teachers) with the knowledge/skills to implement the new methods of assessment for a proficiency-based college admission system.

Future Changes Affecting the Preparation Programs

TSPC has proposed a number of changes in the licensure system that will affect the educator professions and preparation programs. There would be an Initial and Continuing license, no longer a Basic and Standard. This change requires legislative approval in 1997 (adoption of Senate Bill 124) to change the existing TSPC statute.

There would be a professional development requirement in addition to successful employment in a school district for meeting the Continuing license (requires legislative adoption of Senate Bill 124 and further approvals from the TSPC). OSSHE institutions will be expected to play a role in providing needed professional development opportunities for educators. Presently, professional development programs are subject to OSSHE's self-support continuing education and summer policies.

All higher education institutions with TSPC-approved programs would have until 1998 to develop new four-stage preparation programs. The current two -- Elementary and Secondary -- would be redesigned to four -- Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle, and High School. TSPC adopted this policy change in 1996.

TSPC has also requested that each student in an approved program be asked to train in two of the four levels, such as Early Childhood/Elementary, Elementary/Middle, or Middle/High School. This would mean that all preservice students would complete coursework and practicum in two, and that OSSHE's programs would require extended coursework and practicum opportunities to comply with these changes.

Other changes are also affecting (and will in the future) OSSHE's programs and services. The impetus comes from local school districts responding to school improvement directions; the Oregon Department of Education; individuals in the profession seeking access to new professional development opportunities; changes within many content areas from national standards groups (e.g., mathematics, sciences, foreign languages); technology's impact on education, particularly the Internet; and the growing diversity of the state's population, requiring greater attention to multicultural preparation.

OSSHE Institution Responses

OSSHE institutions have already begun to respond to these changes, primarily through reallocated resources and external grants. For example:

Statewide Initiatives

Several statewide initiatives, housed with the Chancellor's Office, are providing professional development assistance to teachers and OSSHE institutions in responding to school reform changes. These include:

Summary

OSSHE's Colleges of Education -- and the many academic departments which play a vital role in preparing new teachers in the various "content" disciplines -- have been greatly impacted by the changes of the past decade. The late 1980s marked a transition from primarily four- to fifth-year programs for the OSSHE institutions, and a reduction by about one-third of student enrollments in education programs. The independent institutions now prepare half of the new educators for the state, though OSSHE institutions still prepare the majority of educators in many of the "specialties."

Measure 5 resulted in major cutbacks to several OSSHE institutions in their education programs. At nearly the same time, however, passage of the Educational Act for the 21st Century called for stepped-up activity within OSSHE institutions (preparation of new types of staffing for 21st Century schools, the provision of new professional development opportunities for educators, increased direct involvement with school sites for the type of "building-wide" changes required for school reform). TSPC's proposed licensure changes will require that OSSHE Colleges of Education move from a two-stage licensure program (elementary/secondary) to a new four-stage system by 1998 (early childhood, elementary, middle, high school). And new professional development requirements are anticipated for the continuing licensing of existing teachers, carrying implications for professional development programming by OSSHE institutions.

OSSHE institutions, particularly the Colleges of Education, will face major challenges over the next decade as public schools throughout the state phase in Certificates of Initial and Advanced Mastery (CIM/CAM); OSSHE phases in the PASS system; and the education profession evaluates (and perhaps alters) staffing requirements as it becomes clearer what the needs of 21st century schools will be. To meet these challenges, OSSHE institutions must collaborate closely with public schools, Education Service Districts, social service agencies, business/industry, the education professional associations -- indeed, the rich array of agencies and groups that contribute to educational policy-setting and the operation of successful public schools and educator preparation programs.

(Copies of the full proposal are available from the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

(No Board action required)

ONE YEAR LATER: THE STATUS OF 1994-95 OSSHE BACHELOR'S GRADUATES

Executive Summary

The study identifies what OSSHE baccalaureate graduates in 1994-95 were doing 6 to 12 months following graduation. Campuses worked with the Chancellor's Office to identify common questions and procedures to be integrated into existing data collection efforts. A total of 2,736 1994-95 graduates on the seven campuses returned mailed questionnaires. The seven institutions include: Eastern Oregon University (EOU), Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), Oregon State University (OSU), Portland State University (PSU), Southern Oregon University (SOU), the University of Oregon (UO), and Western Oregon University (WOU). The overall response rate was slightly less than 40 percent, but individual campus response rates ranged from 20 percent to 97 percent.

What proportion of 1994-95 OSSHE graduates are employed?

More than eight out of ten of the 1994-95 bachelor's graduates are employed 6 to 12 months following graduation. About one in five is continuing their education (8 percent are continuing their education and another 14 percent are combining work with advanced education primarily in graduate or professional school). About 4 percent are not working but are seeking work.

Majors in which bachelor's graduates are employed at levels greater than the OSSHE average (84 percent) include engineering (93 percent), agriculture and forestry (93 percent), business (92 percent), computer science (93 percent), health-related fields (92 percent), and education (89 percent).

Majors in which bachelor's graduates are employed at levels lower than the OSSHE average include mathematics and science (73 percent), liberal arts (79 percent), and social sciences (81 percent).

These 1994-95 baccalaureate recipients are employed in all sectors of the economy, including private business (59 percent), public and private education (24 percent), government (13 percent), nonprofit organizations (2 percent), and self-employed (2 percent).

The majority of respondents (70 percent) are found in managerial and professional specialty occupations, such as managers, engineers, writers, social workers, and teachers.

These graduates take a wide range of jobs -- 23 percent are managers in a variety of fields, 20 percent are teachers (15 percent at K-12 level and 5 percent at postsecondary institutions), 14 percent are engineers, computer or math scientists, 7 percent are in health-related fields, 6 percent are in agriculture/forestry/fisheries, 6 percent provide technical support, 5 percent are social workers, 8 percent provide administrative support, 5 percent have sales-related jobs, 3 percent hold service jobs, 2 percent hold construction and repair jobs, and 1 percent are writers, artists, or musicians.

Of those employed, three-fourths of 1994-95 bachelor's graduates from seven OSSHE institutions are employed in Oregon, ranging from 66 percent of UO graduates to 85 percent of PSU graduates.

One year after graduation, 21 percent of baccalaureate recipients are continuing their education (13 percent are enrolled and employed, and 8 percent are enrolled). Of those continuing their education, more than three-fourths are enrolled in graduate or professional schools, 11 percent are attending seminars or workshops, 3 percent are attending community colleges, and 9 percent are involved in other educational activities.

The median income range for 1994-95 bachelor's completers is between $15,000 and $24,999. Almost 40 percent were employed within a year of graduation at jobs earning $25,000 or more.

Those respondents more likely to complete an internship as part of the bachelor's degree majored in health-related fields (98 percent), education (76 percent), agriculture, forestry and environment (61 percent), engineering and computer science (50 percent), and other career-related majors such as architecture and journalism (67 percent). Those graduates least likely to have this opportunity majored in business (45 percent), math and sciences (39 percent), liberal arts (36 percent), and social sciences (40 percent).

Almost nine of ten respondents indicated that what they learned in college was helpful in performing their job.

OSSHE graduates rate highly the education they received. Based on their experiences since graduation, 16 percent of the bachelor's graduates rate the education they received as "excellent," 56 percent "very good," 20 percent "good," 7 percent "fair," and 1 percent "poor."

Graduates were asked to provide a reason for their rating. Their comments focus on several broad areas: academics, practical experience, teaching, academic advising, student services and administration, student finances, university finances, and the overall experience. The majority of responses are concentrated in four areas -- 74 percent focus on some aspect of the academic program, 15 percent on the quality of instruction, 5 percent on the overall experience, and 3 percent on practical experience. Very few students (1 percent or less) discuss issues concerning student services, university finances, research facilities, or student finances. Overall, student comments tend to be positive about their academic program, the quality of instruction, practical experience, and their overall university experience. Students are less positive about academic advising, other student services, and fiscal issues.

(The full report is in the supplementary section of the Board's docket.)

(No Board action required)

SUMMARY OF FACILITIES CONTRACTING ACTIVITIES

Staff Report to the Board

This report summarizes the professional consultant agreements and construction contracts awarded, along with projects completed, by the seven OSSHE institutions primarily during the quarter ending March 31, 1997.

Professional Consultant Agreements

Erb Memorial Union, Food Service & Recreation Facilities Improvements, UO

An agreement was negotiated with McBride/Seder Associated Architects for architectural services at the University of Oregon on a fixed-fee basis not to exceed $50,350. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Erb Memorial Union, Food Service & Recreation Facilities Improvements, UO

An agreement was negotiated with Thomas Ricca Associates for consulting services at the University of Oregon on a fixed-fee basis not to exceed $12,600. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Intercollegiate Athletics Facilities Improvements, UO

An agreement was negotiated with WBGS Architecture and Planning, PC, for architectural services at the University of Oregon on a fixed-fee basis not to exceed $738,216. Financing will be provided from athletic department funds.

Long House Feasibility Study, PSU

An agreement was negotiated with StastnyBrun Architects, Inc., for architectural services at Portland State University for a basic services fee of $28,000. Financing will be provided from the Board's reserve for architectural and engineering planning.

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology Feasibility Study, UO

An agreement was negotiated with Church & Merrill Architects, PC, for architectural services at the University of Oregon. Maximum compensation for services is $14,000. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Riverfront Research Park, UO

An agreement was negotiated with Duncan & Brown for consulting services at the University of Oregon. Compensation for services is not to exceed $6,700. Financing will be provided from institutional funds.

Student Housing/Elementary School, PSU

An agreement was negotiated with Boora Architects for architectural services at Portland State University. Maximum compensation for services is $21,200. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Urban Center Project, PSU

An agreement was negotiated with Thomas Hacker & Associates for architectural services at Portland State University to be provided for the lump sum fee of $1,351,321. Financing will be provided from a federal grant.

Vivian Olum Child Development Center, UO

An agreement was negotiated with L. B. Olson & Associates, Inc., for consulting services at the University of Oregon. Maximum compensation for these services will be $1,450. Financing will be provided from gift funds.

Awards of Construction Contracts

Beall Hall Seating Replacement, UO

On September 23, 1996, Emerald Valley Construction, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $92,930. Financing will be provided from institutional funds.

Boiler House, OSU

On November 19, 1996, Ramsay-Gerding Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $171,326. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Erb Memorial Union, Food Service & Recreational Facilities Improvements, UO

On December 2, 1996, Wildish Building Company was awarded a contract for this project. An acceptable Guaranteed Maximum Price will be prepared and submitted at a mutually agreeable time during the preparation of construction contract documents. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds to be repaid by student building fees.

Food Innovation Center, OSU

On November 25, 1996, Anderson Construction Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project . An acceptable Guaranteed Maximum Price will be prepared and submitted at a mutually agreeable time during the preparation of construction documents. Financing will be provided from a combination of federal funds and gifts.

Intercollegiate Athletic Facilities Improvements, UO

On September 3, 1996, Chambers Construction was awarded a contract for this project. An acceptable Guaranteed Maximum Price will be prepared and submitted at a mutually agreeable time during the preparation of construction contract documents. Financing will be provided from athletic department funds.

McArthur Court Modifications Project, UO

On February 22, 1996, 2G Construction, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $195,660. Financing will be provided from auxiliary funds.

McArthur Court Seating Modifications Project, UO

On January 22, 1996, Nor-Pac Systems, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $364,223. Financing will be provided from auxiliary funds.

Milne Computer Center Basement Remodel, OSU

On November 21, 1996, J. T. Stephens Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $348,013. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Museum of Natural History, UO

On January 22, 1996, Morris P. Kielty, General Contractor was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $176,154. Financing will be provided from gift funds.

Student Housing Project, EOU

On July 1, 1996, Michael A. Becker General Contractor, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $3,276,944. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds to be repaid from the consolidated dorm debt service reserve.

Weigand Hall Repipe Project, OSU

On November 19, 1996, Industrial Advantage was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $299,000. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

William W. Knight Law Center, UO

On October 2, 1996, Hoffman Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project. An acceptable Guaranteed Maximum Price will be prepared and submitted at a mutually agreeable time during the preparation of construction contract documents. Financing will be provided from gifts and Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Acceptance of Projects

Autzen Skysuite Window Replacement, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on December 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $116,999. Financing was provided from auxiliary funds.

Autzen Stadium Seating Replacement, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on November 27, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $554,761. Financing was provided from athletic department funds.

Batcheller Hall Parapet Reinforcement, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on December 20, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $144,476. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Bean Residence Hall, East Complex Repairs, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on February 1, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $929,847. Financing was provided from housing funds.

Book Storage Shelving, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on October 11, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $92,685. Financing was provided from gift funds.

Fishhawk Creek Bridges, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on January 10, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $126,069. Financing was provided from general funds.

Fairbanks Hall Exterior Restoration, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on September 30, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $958,158. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Fairbanks Hall Piping Replacement, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on December 20, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $161,844. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Hamilton Hall Air Conditioning Upgrade, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on January 22, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $215,752. Financing was provided from housing funds.

Heat Plant Reroof, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on January 22, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $160,825. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Helen Gordon Child Development Center Reroof, PSU

This project is complete and was accepted on December 11, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $106,112. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Howe Field Softball Dugouts, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on December 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $158,963. Financing was provided from auxiliary funds.

Laboratory Theater, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on October 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $574,563. Financing was provided from gift funds.

Memorial Union Commons Renovation, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on October 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $2,134,520. Financing was provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds, gifts, and a SELP loan.

Onyx Bridge Lab Modernization/Mechanical, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on December 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $387,916. Financing was provided from grant funds.

Oregon Hall Reroof, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on January 15, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $167,980. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Oregon Hall Energy Conservation Measures, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on February 4, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $810,020. Financing was provided from capital repair funds and a utility rebate.

Primary Electrical Service Upgrade, EOU

This project is complete and was accepted on December 2, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $129,484. Financing was provided from Article XI-G Bond funds.

Pedestrian Walkway Replacement Project, EOU

This project is complete and was accepted on December 2, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $182,221. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Science Building 2 Reroof, PSU

This project is complete and was accepted on December 11, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $183,713. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Dining Hall Service Improvements at Carson and Hamilton Halls, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on January 15, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $187,214. Financing was provided from housing department maintenance reserves.

Social Science Reroof, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on January 21, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $140,867. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Student Family Housing Demolition, Phase 2, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on November 26, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $132,827. Financing was provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Student Family Housing Demolition, Phase 2, Site Preparation, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on January 15, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $430,197. Financing was provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

University Inn Fire Alarm Upgrade, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on December 5, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $92,844. Financing was provided from auxiliary funds.

(No Board action required)

SOLUTION TEAM ON GRADUATE EDUCATION & RESEARCH

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Charge to the Solution Team: Chancellor Cox charged the Solution Team to address "greater critical mass in strategically needed graduate education and research programs key to Oregon's future through investment and consolidation." Therefore, our work focused on the relationship of research and graduate education to the needs of Oregon's economy and did not address other aspects of research and graduate education. (The text of the Chancellor's charge is in Appendix A of the full report.)

Membership of the Solution Team: The members of the Solution Team were drawn from a cross section of Oregon's industry sectors: natural resources, technology, finance, health care, professional services, and higher education. (Members of the Team and their affiliations are shown in Appendix B of the full report.)

Content of this report: The full report contains an introductory section to provide the reader with an overview of its context, findings of the Solution Team, recommendations, and appendices with supporting data and references. There is much that is very good, indeed excellent, in our research and graduate programs but the focus of this report is on the areas that need further attention.

MAJOR FINDINGS

Transformation of Oregon's economy: Oregon is in the midst of a major economic and social transformation, with its economy increasingly dependent upon high-quality graduate education, applied research, technology transfer, and continuing professional education to stay competitive in the global economy. There have been adjustments at the margin within higher education, but there have not been transforming changes in the mix of degrees produced, the nature of continuing education programs, the amount of applied research and technology transfer, or the system of governance.

Increasing importance of forecasting industry trends: Accurate forecasting is critical to the System's ability to adjust the mix of university programs and degree production. We believe that higher education must develop an on-going capability to forecast industry trends that affect higher education in order to be responsive to the marketplace of the future. The System must incorporate, in its forecasting, the needs of emerging growth companies and industries that, although currently small, will be of greater importance to Oregon's economy in the future.

Growing demand for managerial and professional degrees in the private sector: Oregon businesses have created tens of thousands of new professional and managerial jobs over the past decade, but Oregon's public colleges and universities have not increased degree production correspondingly to meet this need. As a result, Oregon's companies have had to rely on out-of-state recruiting, despite higher cost and shrinking supply caused by the turnaround in California's economy. If Oregon's universities do not respond, the growth of the private sector in both mature and emerging businesses will be curtailed.

Growing demand for graduate-level continuing education: Professionals and managers must stay current in fields that are changing rapidly. This has created a huge market for professional continuing education to which higher education in Oregon has not yet responded. Oregon's colleges and universities should be the "preferred providers" of professional continuing education for Oregon companies, and if they lack the expertise within the institution, our campuses should serve as brokers for cutting-edge programs.

Criticality of research and innovation: Oregon's colleges and universities rank fourth highest in the nation in contracts and grants per faculty member. However, Oregon is deficient in developing close relationships between university research and industry research and development (R&D). If the levels of applied research and technology transfer at our universities do not increase substantially, Oregon corporations will site R&D elsewhere, many entrepreneurs will choose to start their R&D-intensive companies elsewhere, and corporations in other states will not site R&D facilities in Oregon. All of these decisions deprive Oregon of high-wage, stable jobs and payroll.

Increasing the priority of research and graduate education: The private sector wants and deserves high-quality research capability, graduate education and continuing education that addresses its needs. These needs are in conflict with the State Legislature's primary interest, which has been to teach more undergraduates as inexpensively as possible. The Solution Team supports new investments, in addition to reallocations, on the condition that funding is specifically targeted, accountable, and responsive to the economic and social changes in Oregon.

Enriching the definition of educational quality: The Solution Team believes that the focus should be on continuous quality improvement in all educational programs, which implies an emphasis on outcome-based measures. Programs should be subject to rigorous review on a regular basis. Students should be held to high standards both in knowledge of the discipline and competencies in problem solving, critical thinking, communications, and other behavioral skills. The Team urges inclusion of these behavioral competencies in every aspect of curriculum, as well as the expansion of interdisciplinary programs and the use of innovative approaches to educational delivery. Performance measures should also be instrumental to the way campuses are funded.

Restructuring higher education governance in Oregon: There has been a fundamental transformation in the way Oregon colleges and universities are financed in the latter half of the 20th century. Whereas the State once provided most of the budget, today the State General Fund represents less than 30 percent of higher education's total revenues. However, there has not been a corresponding re-engineering of the system of governance to encourage entrepreneurism and to produce greater flexibility and responsiveness. With the passage of Senate Bill 271 in 1995, the State System was granted some additional flexibility but the Higher Education Administrative Efficiency Act did not go far enough. If higher education is to become an asset in a knowledge-based economy, there must be fewer constraints on the State System and greater flexibility for the campuses in pricing and program decisions.

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS

The full report contains 14 recommendations and supporting rationale in six general categories: Demand and Resources; Continuing Education; Quality of Graduate Education; Research; Communications; and Decision-Making Flexibility. The key initiatives recommended to the Chancellor by the Solution Team are:

Transform key aspects of graduate education, continuing professional education, research, technology transfer, and governance to be better aligned with Oregon's social and economic transformation. Oregon's colleges and universities have labored under the constraints of limited funding while delivering on their traditional missions. Now, with the transformation of Oregon's economy at the end of the 20th century, the missions of higher education are broader and more central to the state's future. There has been a fundamental shift in the ways Oregon colleges and universities are funded, but other key aspects have not been transformed to match the new realities. While recognizing and retaining that which is working well, there must be transforming changes in the mix of degrees produced, the delivery of continuing education programs, the amount of applied research, the expansion of technology transfer, and the effectiveness of governance if higher education is to be a more valuable asset to the citizens of the state.

Establish a strategic marketing function to analyze trends, forecast demand, and conduct targeted market research. We urge implementation of a systematic process for continuous assessment of the current and emerging market demand for graduate-level education and research, in collaboration with other public and private organizations. Use strategic marketing to improve communications between higher education and its constituencies -- from the targeted use of advisory boards in specific disciplines to increasing general public understanding of the importance of graduate education and research and its relevance to their lives. Oregon's priorities must not be limited to teaching more undergraduates at the lowest possible cost.

Respond to the growing demand for managerial and professional degrees in the private sector. Targeted investments should be made in specific programs to increase degree production in areas crucial to Oregon's economy. Presidents, provosts, deans, and faculty should structure academic programs around preparing students to become excellent citizens, employees, communicators, innovators, and leaders.

Expand and strengthen continuing education so that it will meet the needs of employers and prospective students statewide, including marketable content, teaching technology, pricing, and location. Encourage free-market competition and responsiveness. Establish monetary and non-monetary incentives for the full participation of regular faculty in continuing education, and make full use of strategic alliances and educational brokering.

Appoint and empower a high-level Science and Technology Council with strong representation from both employers and academic institutions. Charge the Council to move forward in building communication bridges between academe and business, inventory research opportunities, refine research guidelines, host symposia, facilitate technology transfer, and develop fund sources for research. Encourage the university presidents to hire more faculty with applied research interests. Expand technology transfer offices and research parks. Create the ability for universities to take an equity position in startups based upon faculty research. Acknowledge the instrumental role that research plays in the quality of education at all levels, as well as the importance of generating new knowledge to the vitality of Oregon in the global economy.

Upgrade the quality of education by using rigorous, outcome-oriented standards for measuring student competencies, in both disciplinary knowledge and behavioral skills.

Increase flexibility for the State System and the campuses. The Solution Team recommends to the Governor's Task Force on Higher Education and the Economy that it propose ways to reduce constraints on the State System and create greater flexibility for the campuses in pricing and program decisions. The Governor's Task Force should seriously consider the models developed by OHSU, OPB, and universities in other states as alternatives to the present centralized State System and create greater autonomy for one or more campuses, including the possibility of independence from the State System.

CONCLUSION

In short, the Solution Team on Research and Graduate Education finds that incremental improvements, at the margin, are not sufficient to prepare higher education to meet the economic and social needs of Oregon for the century that is nearly upon us. We strongly urge the Chancellor, the State Board of Higher Education, the Governor, the legislature, and the Governor's Task Force to take bold action on the recommendations in this report.

(No Board action required)

SOLUTION TEAM ON GRADUATE EDUCATION & RESEARCH IN PORTLAND

RECOMMENDATIONS

Initiation of Ongoing Planning Process

To strengthen the research environment in the metropolitan area, as well as to enhance access to graduate education, a planning process should be initiated by Portland State University and Oregon Health Sciences University, in cooperation with the OSSHE Council of Presidents. The process should address the following questions on a regular basis and advise the Chancellor on appropriate collaborative and investment strategies to address the graduate education and research needs of the metropolitan area.

Traditional Advanced Degrees

Citizens of the Portland metro area have only limited access to traditional doctorates in the arts and sciences unless they are able and willing to drive to Eugene or Corvallis to obtain them. It is in the interest of the metropolitan region to facilitate access to traditional graduate programs currently offered outside the metro area in order to expand the intellectual capital of the region. This can be accomplished through modifications in existing graduate policies of the OHSU, PSU, OSU, and UO regarding residency sites, exchange of credits, and the supervision of advanced work by faculty members in the metro area, especially at the doctoral level. These partnerships may be extended to WSU if current discussion about reciprocity between the states of Oregon and Washington are concluded successfully. Such policies would permit a resident of the metropolitan region to engage in doctoral study with faculty in the region and would not require the authorization of new degree-granting authority.

Principles for Investing in Graduate/Research Capacity in the Portland Metropolitan Area

An investment strategy must be developed that sustains and expands the current production of advanced degrees in the Portland metro area at PSU to serve the existing needs of the public schools, the public sector, and the private sector. At the same time, additional investments must be made to serve the rapidly growing needs of the private sector for professional and managerial personnel and to address the demands created by statewide implementation of educational reform as well as to foster the diversification and growth of the Oregon economy through support for safe communities, an excellent educational system, protection of the unique quality of the Oregon environment, and effective and efficient social services.

Criteria for Evaluating Proposals for Enhancing Existing Graduate Programs or Introducing New Ones in the Portland Metropolitan Area

Demand

Quality

Partnerships

Goal Alignment

Sponsorship

Cost-Effective

Context

(No Board action required)