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M.S., APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY, SOU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Southern Oregon University requests Board authorization to implement an instructional program leading to the M.S. in Applied Psychology, effective fall 2000. Other related master's program in the Oregon University System are the following: Counseling, Family, and Human Services, UO; Counseling, OSU; Psychology, UO and PSU; Medical Psychology, OHSU; and School Psychology, UO. Many of these programs are offered in the institution's College of Education and relate more to school counseling. PSU's Psychology program is an individualized master's program available to a limited number of students. SOU's program would be offered through the Psychology Department.

Background

For a number of years, SOU has had two types of psychology programs: (1) a 45-credit nonprofessional program that is particularly popular with international students and (2) the Professional Counselor Preparation Program, which is a 72-credit program that trains students to become Oregon licensed professional counselors. During its most recent preparation for accreditation, SOU asked departments to conduct self-evaluations. As part of that process, the Psychology Department organized various focus groups, consisting mainly of mental health and human resource professionals from northern California and southern Oregon. These focus groups identified three areas in which regional needs could be better served by SOU's psychology programs. The first would be a program for mental health counseling, especially as it applies to rural areas. The second would be the transition from clinical to administrative work (or human services). The third would be group facilitation and training.

Description

This program proposal is designed from information gleaned from those focus groups and will replace the Professional Counselor Preparation Program. As originally conceived, the program will provide professional training in applying psychological principles in public and private settings. Students will complete a common core of graduate courses and choose one of three areas of specialization: mental health counseling, group facilitation and training, or human services. The specialization areas, or tracks, were amended slightly according to recommendations made by the external review team. Each track is described in more detail below.

Mental Health Counseling

This program track meets the standards of the national counselor accreditation association (CACREP). Students will complete 900 hours of internship with regional mental health agencies. Graduates of this program will be eligible to sit for the National Board of Certified Counselors' certification examination. After additional hours of postgraduate supervision, they would be eligible for licensure in Oregon (Licensed Professional Counselor). They would also be eligible for licensure in 44 other states that recognize the professional counseling degree.

This track responds to the need for mental health professionals, particularly in more rural areas (e.g., Klamath Falls, Grants Pass, Siskiyou County). Nationally, the field of mental health counseling is expected to experience rapid job growth (approximately 33 percent), and in the state, more than 700 new jobs are anticipated by the year 2005. In addition, student interest in the proposed program has been robust. SOU expects to admit 22 students to this track every other year.

Group Facilitation and Training

This track is designed to respond to the growing state and national demand for training in organizations. Components of the program include training in organizational psychology, human resources management (including preventive programs in business/industry such as stress management and health psychology), group process and training, and educational media. Students will have practica in which they develop, implement, and evaluate training programs. Graduates of the program will be skilled in the facilitation of group and work-team process, program development and evaluation, and instructional process and design.

Several regional focus groups reinforced SOU's perspective that this track is an important component of the proposed master's program. Employment prospects are expected to be robust. In Oregon, growth rate predictions are 23-36 percent for related occupations. The national picture is not far behind; according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, job growth rates are projected at 8-18 percent. SOU anticipates admitting 12 students to this track each year.

Human Services

This track will be geared to regionally based mid-career social service providers who want to expand their knowledge and professional skills. To accommodate these working professionals, much of the coursework will be offered in the evenings and on weekends. Program development, implementation, and evaluation will be highlighted. Students will be required to understand the breadth of prevention and intervention strategies across the lifespan, and they will be provided an elective option to specialize in services for children, youth, and families. (This same option will be provided to those students in the mental health counseling track.) All students in this track will have internships in local human service organizations.

In Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, and Lake counties, more than 40 new jobs per year are expected in human services occupations. At the state level, "human services worker" was listed among the top-ten fastest-growing occupations. SOU plans to admit five students to this track each year.

Resources

SOU has six tenured/tenure-track faculty who will participate in this program, as well as adjuncts who are practicing professionals. In addition, SOU has made two new faculty hires who will be central to the offering of this program. One faculty member was recruited from the OIT faculty in Applied Psychology, and the other faculty member is a counseling psychologist who has a background in multicultural and Native American mental health. SOU intends to hire a third faculty member (a clinical psychologist) over the next three to four years to teach both graduate counseling and undergraduate courses. Additional staffing needs will be met by a .5 FTE clerical support person and a nine-month .08 FTE graduate assistant.

Modest equipment and facility needs are noted in the budget (e.g., computers, camcorder). Approximately $5,700 per year will be needed to supplement current library holdings, in addition to a one-time investment of $2,000 to increase relevant video holdings. After the program has started, there should be no ongoing additional costs that are not covered by student tuition and fees.

Conclusion

All appropriate University committees and the Academic Council have positively reviewed the proposed program. The external review team had a favorable response to the proposal. It praised the clarity of the program objectives, departmental competence to conduct assessment, overall curriculum design, vitality of the undergraduate program, and strength and commitment of the faculty. The team made a number of minor recommendations, some of which have resulted in program proposal modifications by SOU. For example, the team expressed concerns about the child and family specialization within the mental health counseling track and suggested that SOU consider the possibility of adding a multicultural specialization instead. SOU has committed to dropping the child and family specialization and is exploring the multicultural focus, as well as other ways that community needs might be met through this program.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Southern Oregon University to establish a program leading to the M.S. in Applied Psychology. The program would be effective fall 2000, and the OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2005-06 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

ENDORSEMENT, ESOL/BILINGUAL, SOU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Southern Oregon University requests Board authorization to implement a program leading to an English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)/Bilingual teaching endorsement, effective immediately. The other OUS institutions that offer ESOL/Bilingual endorsement programs are EOU, OSU, PSU, UO, and WOU.

The proposed endorsement, which is aligned with requirements set forth by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission, emphasizes five broad areas of competence: language foundations, cultural foundations, pedagogy, assessment, and professional leadership. Students will complete eight courses (22 credits), as well as participate in career-development activities including field-based practica (90 hours of supervised teaching). In addition to on-site offerings, classes will be offered over distance-learning technologies such as interactive video, Web-based instruction, and audio conferencing. In order to serve students from around the region, classes will also be offered in public schools and alternative learning sites (e.g., ESDs).

The increase in the number of K-12 students with limited English proficiency (LEP) is the impetus for this program. Currently, more than 3,000 LEP students are enrolled in public schools in the three-county southern Oregon region. A 1999 survey revealed that being placebound is the major reason teachers have not been able to pursue this endorsement. Employment opportunities for teachers with this endorsement are vast. ESOL/bilingual is a teacher-shortage area nationally as well as in Oregon.

SOU recently received two Title VII grants from the U.S. Department of Education. The "Teachers and Personnel" grant will serve practicing teachers who wish to complete requirements for an ESOL/Bilingual endorsement. The "Career Ladder Program" grant will serve individuals who are currently instructional assistants in the 13 local school districts. This grant will provide varied services for the instructional assistants as they complete preparation programs that ultimately lead to a teaching license and an ESOL/Bilingual endorsement.

Resources for this endorsement program are in place. In addition to the grant-funded activities and personnel, members of SOU's education and foreign language departments, as well as practicing public school and ESD teachers and administrators, will be involved in the delivery and evaluation of this program. SOU's library holdings in the area of multicultural education have been expanded during the last several years, and additional curriculum materials suitable for bilingual instruction were purchased. The SOU library also has assigned a faculty member to serve students in ED-NET courses. All other facilities and equipment are adequate for this program.

SOU anticipates 60 to 70 students per year in the program. Students may have just completed SOU's M.A.T. program, have a teaching license from another school, be in-service teachers who seek such an endorsement, or be participants in one of SOU's grant programs.

All appropriate University committees and the Academic Council have positively reviewed the proposed program.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Southern Oregon University to establish a program leading to the teaching endorsement in ESOL/Bilingual. The program would be effective immediately.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

B.A./B.S., GENERAL SOCIAL SCIENCE, UO

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

The University of Oregon requests Board authorization to implement a program at the Central Oregon University Center (COUC) leading to the baccalaureate degree in General Social Science, effective fall 2000. The most closely related OUS program is the Liberal Studies major at Oregon State University. UO's major differs in a number of respects. The focus of UO's coursework is in the social sciences, whereas the OSU student majors may concentrate in different disciplines including the humanities (e.g., music, theater arts). Also, the UO program requires 12 credits of methodology/tools courses within the social sciences, which is not a requirement in the OSU program.

The General Social Science curriculum is designed to provide a broad liberal arts education that focuses in the social sciences. The proposed program is interdisciplinary, concentrating on the interaction of people and the importance of culture, social structure, history, institutions, and physical geography. Students will complete a "breadth" requirement consisting of two courses in each of three different disciplines: anthropology, economics, ethnic studies, geography, history, international studies, linguistics, political science, psychology, sociology, and women's studies. Students must also complete 32 upper-division credits in a concentration area, as well as the methodology/tools requirement mentioned above.

The program, which will be offered through COUC in Bend, will attract students who do not have local access to a four-year institution and who have decided not to leave the Bend area to seek a four-year degree. Given the large array of choices of social science majors on the Eugene campus, UO will not offer the major at its home campus. However, if a student from the Bend program had declared a General Social Science major, had completed 16 credit hours of upper-division credit in the major, and then transferred to UO, the student would be allowed to complete the degree program in Eugene. The proposal does allow students to pursue a General Social Science major on the UO campus through independent study, if necessary.

This program is designed specifically to meet the needs of Oregon citizens living in Central Oregon. It has been designed to articulate closely with Central Oregon Community College (COCC) offerings and is developed with the encouragement of both COCC and COUC. Most of the instruction will be face-to-face. COUC and COCC will share resources to offer this program, and some of COCC's faculty will teach courses in the program. They will be appointed by the relevant UO departments and receive courtesy appointments before teaching any courses in this program, thus allowing UO appropriate control. However, 400-level (i.e., senior-level) courses will be taught by regular UO faculty.

Placebound Central Oregon residents currently do not have a social science baccalaureate option. Yet, COCC and COUC administrators indicate that student interest in such a program is high. This interest is not unique to Central Oregon. The social sciences represent nearly 30 percent of UO undergraduate degrees awarded.

Graduates from this program would be prepared for employment in a variety of fields (e.g., law enforcement, business, teaching), as well as continued graduate-level education. UO envisions 15 students per class, with approximately 40 graduates during the first five years.

Resources are sufficient to offer this program. COUC will subsidize the program, on a declining basis, for four to five years. COCC has a new library with up-to-date network connections including one to the Orbis consortium of Pacific Northwest academic libraries. Among services provided are the Orbis Union catalog, Orbis Borrowing, and database licensing services and document delivery. Students also will have access to computer labs with statistical programs, network connections, and geographical information software. No additional facilities, equipment, or technology beyond those on hand are necessary to offer this program.

All appropriate University committees and the Academic Council have positively reviewed the proposed program.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize the University of Oregon to implement a program at the Central Oregon University Center (COUC) leading to the baccalaureate degree in General Social Science. The program would be effective fall 2000, and the OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2005-06 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

RESOLUTION REGARDING CLASSIFIED INFORMATION FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, PSU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

The Industrial Security Manual issued by the U.S. Department of Defense requires that owners, officers, and executive personnel of corporations and regents or trustees of colleges and universities whose employees have access to classified material in the course of working on Department of Defense contracts delegate to others the authority for fulfilling the requirements of the Industrial Security Manual and exclude themselves from access to classified information.

The resolution recommended for adoption is required by the Manual.

RESOLUTION

WHEREAS, current Department of Defense directives contain a provision making it mandatory that the university president, and all principal officers or officials who are specifically and properly designated by the Board as the managerial group with the authority and responsibility for the negotiation, execution, and administration of classified contracts, meet the personnel security clearances requirements established for a contractor's facility security clearance; and

WHEREAS, said Department of Defense directives permit the exclusion from the personnel clearance requirements of certain members of the Board and other officers, provided that this action is recorded in the corporate minutes.

NOW IT IS FURTHER DECLARED that the president, and all principal officers or officials who are specifically and properly designated by the Board as the managerial group with the authority and responsibility for the negotiation, execution, and administration of classified contracts, at the present time do possess, or shall be processed for, the required security clearance; and

BE IT RESOLVED that in the future, when any individual enters upon any duties as president, as one of the principal officers or officials who are specifically and properly designated by the Board as the managerial group with the authority and responsibility for the negotiation, execution, and administration of classified contracts, such individuals shall immediately make application for the required security clearance; and

BE IT RESOLVED FURTHER that the following members of the Board and other officers, shall not require, shall not have, and can be effectively excluded from access to all classified information in the possession of Portland State University, and do not occupy positions that would enable them to affect adversely corporate policies or practices in the performance of classified contracts for the Department of Defense or the User Agencies of the National Industrial Security Program.

Name; Title
Don VanLuvanee; Board President
Jim Lussier; Board Vice President
Herbert Aschkenasy; Board Member
Shawn Hempel; Board Member
Tom Imeson; Board Member
Leslie Lehmann; Board Member
Geraldine Richmond; Board Member
William H. Williams; Board Member
Jim Willis; Board Member
Phyllis Wustenberg; Board Member
Tim Young; Board Member

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends the Board adopt the following resolution regarding access to classified information related to the Department of Defense material.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

OUS DIVERSITY REPORT: THE BENEFITS OF DIVERSITY ON CAMPUS AND BEYOND

Introduction

The concept of "diversity" extends beyond mere representation of people of color to inclusion and engagement. Efforts to increase diversity should be examined in light of this broader understanding. A truly diverse higher education arena will provide fertile ground for the robust exchange of ideas, and benefits will accrue to all parties.

Recent research supports the assertion that benefits of diversity are experienced by individuals (minority and nonminority alike), educational institutions, and organizations, as well as society as a whole. Students benefit by generally exhibiting greater active-thinking processes and demonstrating higher levels of intellectual engagement and motivation. They possess an increased racial and cultural awareness and support of racial understanding, as well. Faculty are also positively affected; they are more likely to utilize active-learning methods in the classroom, participate in faculty-development activities, and engage in research on race/ethnicity. Society also benefits by having an educated citizenry with greater cross-cultural competence.

Oregon University System

Students

Total enrollment of students of color increased by nearly 500 students in the last year, from 7,963 in fall 1998 to 8,441 in fall 1999. Overall, the System's percentage of students of color slightly exceeds that of Oregon's state minority population (12.5 percent vs. approximately 11.2 percent [the latest state of Oregon population data available are for 1998., respectively]). However, when examined by race/ethnicity, we find greater representation of Asian/Pacific Americans (6.4 percent, OUS; 3.0 percent, Oregon), the same percentage of American Indians/Alaska Natives (1.4 percent), and lower percentages of representation for African Americans (1.6 percent, OUS; 1.8 percent, Oregon) and Hispanics/Latinos (3.2 percent, OUS; 5.0 percent, Oregon). Social science and business are the two disciplines with the greatest concentrations of students of color earning degrees; this is consistent with degree awards for all OUS students during 1998-99.

Faculty and Staff

Systemwide, faculty of color represent 218 (9.5 percent) of all full-time, ranked, instructional faculty, and this level of representation has been consistent for the past two years. The disciplines with the greatest number of faculty of color are humanities and fine arts (58), high-market disciplines (43), natural science/mathematics (36), and the social sciences (33).

This report provides the first data available on OUS staff diversity, which are therefore viewed as baseline information. People of color represent 8.3 percent of all staff. When presented by occupational designation, of all executive/administrative and managerial staff, 5.8 percent are people of color, and of all other professionals (e.g., support and service staff), 9.2 percent are people of color.

Institutions

Each of the OUS institutions employs a variety of initiatives to enhance diversity on its campus. Some examples of these efforts follow:

(No Board action required)

FOLLOW-UP REVIEWS CONDUCTED IN 1999-00 OF SELECTED PROGRAMS

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

In November 1990, the Board approved a policy directing the OUS Office of Academic Affairs to conduct a follow-up review of each degree program or significant new option within an existing degree program approved by the Board since January 1, 1983. The purpose of the follow-up review is to describe the status of the programs five years after their full implementation. For each program major, institutions have reported briefly on major modifications in the program, enrollment, degree production, accreditation (when applicable), resources, and student outcomes. Certificate and subdegree programs provide abbreviated information.

During the 1999-00 academic year, the following programs were reviewed:

Oregon Institute of Technology

Oregon State University

University of Oregon

Western Oregon University

Oregon State University/Oregon Health Sciences University (joint program)

Summaries of the eight program reviews follow.

B.S., APPLIED ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, OIT

In May 1995, the Board authorized Oregon Institute of Technology to offer an instructional program leading to the B.S. in Applied Environmental Sciences (AES). The program emphasizes applied skills and knowledge in the areas of data acquisition, manipulation, interpretation, and presentation as they relate to environmental science. Students learn how to perform quantitative interpretation of biological, chemical, and geographical data and how to incorporate holistic approaches to solving problems on a bioregional scale that include sociological, economic, and political issues.

The AES program has undergone significant modifications since its inception, although the basic tenets of the program remain the same. OIT's receipt of two National Science Foundation (NSF) grants, totaling nearly $300,000, helped shape some of these changes. The first NSF grant funded the construction of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and Image Analysis Laboratory, which paved the way for the development of a technical emphasis on GIS within the AES program. As a result, OIT's AES program now has the most extensive undergraduate GIS curriculum in the state.

Another major modification was in response to the large number of transfer students to the program. Because of the emphasis within the program on acquainting students with state-of-the-art technology at an early stage in the curriculum, students transferring to OIT for their third year typically lacked basic applicable skills (e.g., in Global Position System [GPS], GIS, calibration, and use of a Hydrolab multiprobe water-quality monitor). Therefore, transfer students had to take freshman-level courses even though they may have already been exposed to the didactic material. The second NSF grant ("Course and Curriculum Development") enabled OIT to address this problem. Various skill portions of courses were recast as self-study computer-aided modules on CDs. Many of the modules include an extensive field day, during which students learn requisite "hands-on" skills.

A third program modification is the result of extended discussions with local and regional professionals, who emphasized the need for people trained in watershed science. This area, which provides students with an understanding of the dynamic interaction of the terrain and biota (animal and plant life of a region), is now the second technical emphasis area in the AES program.

Student enrollment is not as robust as anticipated (an expected 25 students in the first year, up to 200 total when the program was fully operational). Currently, 54 students are majoring in AES, and five degrees have been awarded to date.

Resources are sufficient to operate the program. The student/faculty ratio is 16:1. The program has attracted $500,000 in grants, with more awards pending. The library has added relevant material to its holdings. Facility and equipment availability and upkeep remain concerns of AES faculty.

M.A., ENGLISH, OSU

In February 1993, the Board authorized Oregon State University to offer an instructional program leading to the M.A. in English, with four areas of concentration: English and American literature, creative writing, rhetoric and composition, and literature and culture. Prior to the implementation of the M.A., OSU students wishing to pursue graduate work in English had to enroll in the master's program in Interdisciplinary Studies (M.A.I.S.) and then choose the English option. The M.A. in English is a much more straightforward route for these students.

Students complete 48 credits: 18 core, 18 concentration, and 12 minor. They must write a thesis and satisfactorily pass a final examination, of which half the time is spent defending the thesis. In addition, second language proficiency (equal to second-year university courses) is required.

The English Department has made no major modifications in this program. Faculty resources remain strong, and campus support resources (e.g., library) are adequate. Currently, 30 students are enrolled in the program; another 29 students have completed their coursework and are in the process of completing their theses. To date, 38 students have been awarded degrees.

Graduates of the program, in general, have found employment in related fields, such as teaching or writing, or are working on further graduate education. Some of the positions held by OSU graduates include the following:

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE, APPLIED ETHICS, OSU

In September 1994, the Board authorized Oregon State University to offer an instructional program leading to an undergraduate certificate in Applied Ethics. This multidisciplinary program, which involves faculty in eight colleges, focuses on understanding moral problems within social and cultural contexts and proposes norms, principles, and methods to resolve these problems. The program is open only to OSU students in a baccalaureate-degree program.

To earn this certificate, students are required to complete 28 credits of approved coursework, 16 of which are the philosophical ethics core courses. A minimum of 12 credits of applied ethics electives are required beyond the core. Three elective concentrations are available: ethics and scientific inquiry; ethics and the environment; and ethics, health, and medicine.

No major modifications have been made to this program. Student demand is slightly greater than anticipated; currently, 28 students are enrolled in the program. To date, 47 students have earned certificates.

Over the past five years, students in the certificate program have majored in such programs as biochemistry and biophysics, environmental science, general science, health care administration, liberal studies, and psychology.

Student satisfaction with the program is strong, and graduate surveys indicate that the Applied Ethics certificate has increased employment opportunities and success in graduate school. Ninety percent of those surveyed said that ethics was important in their professional field.

M.A./M.S., ARTS MANAGEMENT, UO

In October 1993, the Board authorized the University of Oregon to offer an instructional program leading to the M.A./M.S. in Arts Management. In this field, knowledge and expertise in the arts (e.g., visual, performing) are combined with social, cultural, educational, and managerial perspectives for the purpose of creating, implementing, and administering cultural programs in organizations and institutions.

This is a 57-credit program. Students select 15 credits in a concentration (i.e., museum studies, performing arts management, community arts management, business/marketing management) in addition to completing 24 core credits and 18 credits of research/practica. Internships (200 hours, required) and a thesis or terminal project choice are other features of the Arts Management major.

The program has undergone no major program modifications, although some changes have occurred. Students now complete a technology component, the objective being to provide students with professional expertise in software applications in order to enhance their presentation skills. One concentration area has been dropped (business/marketing management) and a new area has been added (event management). Faculty resources remain strong, both in terms of total FTE and appropriate diversity in areas of expertise.

Faculty are currently experimenting with distance delivery in anticipation of offering some components of the program to an international audience in the next three to five years.

Student enrollment has been consistent with original expectations. Currently, 31 students are enrolled in the program, and 57 degrees have been awarded to date. Professional endeavors by graduates of the program include:

B.A./B.S., EDUCATIONAL STUDIES, UO

In June 1995, the Board authorized the University of Oregon to offer an instructional program leading to the B.A./B.S. in Educational Studies. Although a baccalaureate program in Educational Studies had been offered at UO previously, the proposal presented to the Board in 1995 represented significant restructuring to develop new specializations plus a teacher licensure option. The three specializations were: learning systems technology, educational and social systems, and integrated licensure.

All students complete a six-course core sequence, three courses preparatory to the major, and the coursework in the specialization. The Educational Studies program is designed to prepare students to:

Students are also prepared for entry into a variety of graduate programs such as special education, social work, psychology, communication disorders and sciences, and school administration.

A number of modifications have occurred in the program since its inception. Some of these have been the result of internal factors (e.g., availability of resources, new initiatives instituted by the University), while others are the result of external factors, particularly licensure requirements set by the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC). Among the most notable modifications are:

The integrated teaching specialization is approved by TSPC, and within the next two years, the UO College of Education will seek national accreditation for its programs through the Teacher Education Accreditation Council.

Faculty and staff resources are sufficient for this program; however, the program would benefit from increased library holdings, greater computer lab hardware/software, and more space to accommodate the large number of students.

Currently, 363 students are enrolled in this major. Students graduating from the program readily find employment in the public and private sectors. In addition, nearly one-quarter of the students continue their studies at the graduate level. The first group of students in the integrated teaching specialization graduated last year, and UO is in the process of conducting a follow-up review of those graduates. Preliminary indications are that most of them are currently employed in public schools in Oregon, California, Washington, Alaska, and Idaho.

TEACHER LICENSURE ENDORSEMENT, EARLY INTERVENTION/EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION, UO

In October 1994, the Board authorized the University of Oregon to establish a program leading to a teacher licensure endorsement in Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education (EI/ECSE). The program has been offered by the Early Intervention area (a division of Special Education and Rehabilitation in the UO College of Education). The Early Intervention area has existed at the University since 1978 and is widely considered to be one of the best programs in the country.

This endorsement was established by the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) in spring 1994. The purpose of this new endorsement was to provide a state-approved credential for teachers working with disabled infants, toddlers, and preschool-aged children and their families. Federal and state legislation and priorities heightened the need for qualified early-intervention personnel. For example, since the summer of 1991, states were required to provide a free, appropriate education to all disabled three-, four-, and five-year-old children.

Early intervention is a field that encompasses a knowledge and practice base directed to populations of children, birth to age six, who are disabled or at risk for development of a disabling condition. Scholarly areas of focus include atypical development; learning disorders; social interactions across families, peers, and community agents; ecological contexts of development (e.g., economic and health conditions); and content and structure of early-intervention programs. Clinical or applied areas include clinical skills for effective intervention with children and family members, team skills for participation on interdisciplinary-assessment and intervention teams, programming and evaluation skills, and professional/interpersonal skills.

Students who already hold a Basic or Standard teaching license with an elementary or special endorsement may "add on" the EI/ECSE endorsement by completing a 32-graduate-credit program, which includes a six-credit practicum. Other students must complete the "stand-alone" program--53 credits, including 15 practica credits. The academic program is accredited by a national body, the Council for Exceptional Children, and the teaching licensure is accredited by TSPC.

The program is dependent on federal and state grants to assist in covering instructional and supervisory costs. In addition, a three-year federal grant enabled UO to offer this program throughout Oregon. However, termination of that grant resulted in termination of the off-campus program.

There have been no major modifications in the program. Minor modifications are made to accommodate changes in faculty, and changes in degree and licensure requirements. Currently, 17 students are enrolled in the program. To date, 6 students have graduated in the add-on program and 84 in the stand-alone program. Graduates of the program are in great demand throughout Oregon and the nation.

B.S., AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE/ENGLISH INTERPRETING, WOU

In January 1995, the Board authorized Western Oregon University to revise its one-year certificate program in Interpreter Preparation: Deafness into a nonteaching B.S. program in American Sign Language/English Interpreting. The curriculum combines classes in language development, linguistics, sociology, education, and professional practices, as well as interpreting theory, technique, and applications.

Through a series of core classes, students are prepared for a vital role in the way deaf children and adults participate in basic education, job-transition programs, and adult learning. Clear objectives were developed for the following core areas:

The course of study ensures incorporation of numerous critical components, such as:

Contact with professional interpreters, consumers, and hearing-impaired children is included throughout the coursework. The final quarter of the program consists of a full-time, supervised internship in a setting that provides real-word interpreting challenges.

No major modifications have been made to this program. Student interest in the program is slightly higher than anticipated. Currently, 36 students are enrolled in the program, and approximately 18 students graduate each year.

Surveys of graduates have revealed a high placement rate (93 percent of respondents) in educational settings. Other graduates are employed as teachers of the deaf, interpreter educators, rehabilitation counselors, or other social service professionals. Several students have continued their education at the graduate level.

Resources are sufficient to offer this program. The library has a designated librarian for interpreter-related material collection and research. The classrooms that are used primarily for interpreter training are fully equipped with cameras and recording equipment. The program has also been able to secure scholarships for students. Over the past five years, three U.S. Department of Education grants have been awarded to WOU for student scholarships, thereby increasing the number of interpreters available to public school programs for deaf children.

DOCTORATE IN PHARMACY (PHARM.D.), OSU AND OHSU

In January 1987, the Board authorized Oregon State University and Oregon Health Sciences University to offer a joint instructional program leading to the professional doctoral degree in Pharmacy (Pharm.D.). Students would be admitted to the program after completing the fourth year of the B.S. in Pharmacy curriculum or after receiving a B.S. in Pharmacy after five years.

Although approved in 1987, this two-year postbaccalaureate program was not implemented until 1995 because of insufficient funding. The program has enrolled approximately nine students per year for the past five years. The first year of the program involves primarily didactic work, which is followed by a year of experiential education. The Pharm.D. degree is jointly conferred by Oregon State University and Oregon Health Sciences University.

Major program modifications are the result of changes in the profession. In 1992, the accrediting body--the American Council of Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE)--determined that all degree programs preparing pharmacists for licensure will be at the level of the professional doctorate (Pharm.D.) by 2002. The faculty of the College of Pharmacy developed an "entry-level" Pharm.D. degree program to address the mandate of ACPE and the faculty's concurrence that additional advanced training will be necessary for future graduates in Pharmacy. The modified program replaces both the baccalaureate Pharmacy program and the postbaccalaureate Pharm.D. program approved in 1987. The last students receiving a postbaccalaureate Pharm.D. degree or a B.S. in Pharmacy degree will graduate in 2002.

The new entry-level Pharm.D. program began in September 1999. To enter the program, students must complete a pre-pharmacy curriculum that requires approximately three years of study. Completion of the pharmacy professional program requires an additional four years. Students complete the first two years of their coursework on the Oregon State University campus. The third professional year is at Oregon Health Sciences University, and the fourth year is off-campus at various pharmacy practice sites throughout the state of Oregon.

There are currently 15 students enrolled in the postbaccalaureate Pharm.D. degree program and 68 students enrolled in the entry-level Pharm.D. degree program. There have been, on average, six to seven degrees awarded to students enrolled in the postbaccalaureate Pharm.D. degree program annually since 1997, and similar numbers of graduates are anticipated in the next two years. Beginning in spring of 2004, 65 to 75 Pharm.D. students per year will graduate from the entry-level program.

Experiential education is distributed throughout the curriculum. During the first two academic years, students participate in service learning activities, and in the third professional year, they are required to enroll in longitudinal patient care experience. Students are also expected to complete two externships focused on understanding pharmacy operations before the beginning of their third professional year. The fourth professional year is a calendar year of clerkship experiences, with a strong emphasis on direct patient care.

Pharmacists are required to pass a national licensure examination. Students from this joint program have had a greater than 90 percent pass rate for the past decade and consistently perform above the national mean. OSU and OHSU have recently begun an annual survey of graduates to determine their employment choices. The majority of graduates practice in community chain settings, with acute care institutional practice a distant second. Approximately 5 to 10 percent continue their education with advanced clinical training.

Resource needs for the revised PharmD program have been met through a number of strategies. OHSU and OSU faculty in the program have courtesy appointments with the partner campus. The transition phase of the program has been fairly smooth, with no new faculty requirements. OSU has reallocated money internally for the program. In addition, students pay a study resource fee of $1,092 per term.

(No Board action required)

STATUS OF THE WESTERN UNDERGRADUATE EXCHANGE PROGRAM

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

This is the annual report on Oregon's experience with the Western Undergraduate Exchange Program (WUE), established by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) in 1988. In 1989, the Oregon State Board of Higher Education approved a staff recommendation for Oregon University System (OUS) institutions to begin participating in WUE.

The goals of WUE are to increase student access and choice while enhancing the efficient use of educational resources among the western states. The basic assumptions underlying WUE are (1) that most institutions have some programs that can accommodate additional students at little or no additional cost, and (2) that additional nonresident students can be attracted to those programs by offering a tuition discount.

Following are the Board guidelines for OUS participation in WUE:

A WUE program must be able to accommodate a limited number of additional students without requiring additional resources;

WUE admissions must be on a space-available basis and limited to the programs approved for WUE participation by the OUS Office of Academic Affairs;

Nonresident students previously or currently enrolled at OUS institutions will not be allowed to convert to WUE status;

WUE students who change majors to a non-WUE program will lose their WUE status;

WUE students enrolled in accordance with the aforementioned guidelines shall continue to be eligible for the WUE tuition rate for the duration of their undergraduate academic program, even if that program is removed from the approved list; and

Institutions participating in WUE are required to provide an annual report to the OUS Office of Academic Affairs reflecting the number of WUE students enrolled by program, together with the students' states of origin.

It is WICHE policy that nonresident WUE students pay 150 percent of resident tuition if they apply and are admitted to one of the designated WUE programs. WUE tuition is significantly less than nonresident tuition at institutions in all participating states.

Over the past ten years, total WUE enrollment in all participating states has grown from just under 4,000 students to nearly 12,000. Last year (1999-00), 950 Oregon residents participated in the WUE program, and Oregon institutions received 1,043 WUE students. This is the first year that Oregon experienced a net gain (i.e., more WUE students coming to Oregon than leaving the state). It is interesting to note that 84 of Oregon's outgoing students attended two-year institutions.

One important change in the WUE program occurred this past year. The state of Arizona approved participation in the WUE program, which is being phased in over a two-year period. One Arizona institution (Central Arizona College) began receiving WUE students in fall 1999. Full-scale participation will begin in fall 2000 and will include two universities as receiving institutions: University of Arizona South and Northern Arizona University. Arizona students will not be eligible for WUE in other states until fall 2000. Thirty-one WUE students elected to attend programs in Arizona in 1999-00.

Nevada receives the most students (more than 1,600 in 1999-00). The states that receive the most Oregon students are Idaho (286), Nevada (211), and Montana (106).

(No Board action required)

Table 1
Students from WUE States
Enrolled at Oregon Institutions

Institution

1990-91

1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

EOU

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

OIT

32

33

55

58

67

70

55

54

102

90

OSU

9

21

34

46

79

112

180

265

329

385

PSU

3

4

3

2

5

6

7

8

19

45

SOU

7

14

36

37

34

66

87

174

253

389

UO

11

16

28

52

84

56

63

43

20

56

WOU

0

0

0

0

2

3

3

32

60

78

TOTALS

62

88

156

195

271

313

395

576

783

1,043

%

 

42%

77%

25%

39%

15%

26%

46%

36%

 

Table 2
Oregon Students Enrolled at
Institutions in WUE States

State

1990-91

1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

Alaska

1

15

13

27

25

34

14

13

12

21

Arizona

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

5

California

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

2

2

2

Colorado

10

13

17

28

39

50

55

57

63

66

Hawaii

4

3

1

3

6

4

11

21

31

51

Idaho

147

352

285

305

327

288

226

223

298

286

Minnesota

12

15

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Montana

87

131

247

269

215

140

114

87

101

106

Nevada

0

0

13

62

73

135

163

201

185

211

New Mexico

1

2

4

6

5

4

4

2

4

1

North Dakota

11

18

19

16

37

34

29

33

37

58

South Dakota

2

8

8

12

12

17

19

21

26

16

Utah

7

6

17

20

32

31

34

46

48

46

Washington

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

21

47

Wyoming

6

5

11

17

13

27

20

24

39

34

TOTALS

288

568

635

765

784

764

689

730

867

950

% Change

 

97%

12%

20%

25%

-3%

-10%

6%

+19%

10%