Oregon University System logoOUS FISCAL YEAR 2002 FEDERAL APPROPRIATIONS

Staff Report to the Board

In a continuing effort to respond to requests from the staff of the seven-member Oregon Congressional delegation, the Oregon University System (OUS) has compiled a Federal Appropriations Priorities List for Fiscal Year 2002. A single priority document, forwarded by the Chancellor, enables Congressional delegation members to address a clear set of stated campus appropriation objectives.

As House and Senate committees begin deliberations on the Federal government's Fiscal Year 2002 budget, the document also prepares congressional staff to deal effectively with specific campus appropriation requests.

The Fiscal Year 2002 federal priority list has been developed along the same lines as the list presented at the February 2000 meeting of the State Board of Higher Education. Due to the unusually late adjournment of the 106th Congress, and the unresolved financing of several campus priorities in the final appropriations bill, the inclusion of "pre-proposals" for this year's list was unavailable.

As always, each OUS institution bears responsibility for the development of the rationale, background material, executive summary, and identification of a likely federal funding source for the institution's "Top Three" priorities. Participants who have been enlisted for the discussion, and the selection of the projects, have remained at the president's discretion.

The project summaries describe partnerships, the overall value of the project to the institutions' programmatic goals, and a rationale illustrating how the project serves long-standing or emerging statewide and regional needs. The funding priorities of each institution accurately reflect the mission of OUS in furthering aspects of instruction, research, and public service.

Chancellor Cox will present the compiled lists in a series of meetings scheduled with the Oregon Congressional delegation the week of February 19, 2001.

INSTITUTION PROGRAM APPROPS.
BILL
AGENCY ACCOUNT $ AMOUNT
REQUESTED
Eastern Oregon University (A) Eastern Oregon Science Center Energy and Water Development Department of Energy Science $5 million
Oregon Institute of Technology A) Oregon Renewable Energy Center Energy and Water Development Department of Energy

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Office of Power Technologies $926,000

  B) Technology Training Programs for Incumbent and Underemployed Workers Labor-HHS-Education Department of Labor Training and Employment Services - Pilots and Demos $950,000
  C) Technology Opportunity Program Labor-HHS-Education (competitive funding) Department of Education Student Support Services $1, 030,404
Oregon State University (A) The Pacific Northwest Institute for Sustainable Natural Resources To be determined
USDA, USDI, USDC, NOAA, EPA
$1.75 million
  (B) Early Childhood Leadership Directions To be determined Dept. of Ed, HHS, USDA Co-op Extension   $1.8 million
  (C)Wildland Fire Science Program Interior USDA Forest Service Per allocations of 2001 National Fire Plan $500,000
Portland State University (A) The University District - Engineering and Science Center VA-HUD
Department of Housing and Urban Development   $3 million
  (B) The Portland Metropolitan Partnership for Secondary School Learning Labor-HHS-Education Department of Education   $1 million
  (C) Mark O. Hatfield School of Government Labor-HHS-Education Department of Education   $2.5 million
Southern Oregon University (A) Native American Performing Arts Project Labor-HHS-Education Department of Education   $500,000
  (B) Southern Oregon Watershed Learning Center To be Determined Dept. of Agriculture, FDA To be Determined $800,000
  (C) Special Education Teacher Training and Mentoring Labor-HHS-Education Department of Education To be Determined $375,000
University of Oregon (A) Brain, Biology and Machine Department of Defense Department of Defense Defense Health Programs $7 million
  (B) Museum of Natural History Labor-HHS-Education Institute of Museum and Library Services National Programs $2.5 million

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the System Strategic Planning Committee refer to the Board for its final approval the Fiscal Year 2002 Federal Appropriation Requests. As the Board had done in previous session of Congress, by approving the campus priorities, it is advancing the projects and proposals to the Oregon Delegation for its consideration and assistance.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

Summary Description of Campus Projects

Eastern Oregon University

Project Name: Eastern Oregon University Science Center
Requested Funding: $5.0 million
Likely Source of Federal Funds: Energy & Water Appropriations Bill for FY 2002

Project Summary: $5.0 million to Eastern Oregon University (EOU) for the construction and renovation of the EOU Science Center in La Grande, Oregon. Utilizing an existing campus facility (Badgley Hall), the Science Center will meet the service and support system requirements for a 97,570 square-foot "smart building"-providing advanced computer technology and network capabilities incorporated into the planned construction of the building. The facility will provide a flexible, responsive environment to meet the learning needs of students at the main campus, through distance education and with EOU's partners. The EOU Science Center houses research and teaching laboratories, classrooms, faculty offices and support areas in a unified facility, serving EOU and regional education, health, science and natural resource programs.

Oregon Institute of Technology

Project Name: Oregon Renewable Energy Center
Requested Funding: $926,000
Likely Source of Federal Funds: U.S. Department of Energy

Project Summary: OREC will engage in renewable energy system engineering and applied research, with emphasis on the application of geothermal systems, photovoltaic power, ground-source heat pumps, fuel-cell systems, and wind power generation, as stand-alone components or integrated into comprehensive renewable energy systems. OREC will apply renewable energy solutions to energy-related problems in the United States and worldwide by: engaging in distributed renewable energy systems engineering and applied research in the fields of geothermal, photovoltaics, ground-source heat pumps, wind power, and fuel-cells; initiating partnerships with sister institutions and industry to develop and evaluate renewable energy system components; developing agricultural, business, industrial, and residential distributed renewable energy system applications; providing college graduates, with renewable energy emphasis, for careers in the energy industry; providing industrial training in renewable energy topics, including installation, maintenance, site analysis, and preparation of renewable energy systems; and providing technical assistance and information dissemination of research and engineering results. OIT has long been noted for its ability to graduate highly educated and technically skilled individuals taught by a faculty who have a real-world market place orientation. OREC will incorporate faculty experience and the energy of OIT students in renewable energy applied research and systems engineering activity.

Oregon Institute of Technology

Project Name: Technology Training Programs for Incumbent and Underemployed Workers
Requested Funding: $950,000
Likely Sources of Federal Funds:Labor/HHS/Education/ Appropriations Bill

Project Summary: In support of its mission as Oregon's polytechnic university, Oregon Institute of Technology proposes to develop a new standard for accessibility to technology training. Through the Oregon Technology Center, OIT will assist in identifying local, state, and regional development needs of technology workers and employers. The OTC will serve as a clearing house and research center for identifying and developing strategies promoting education, skill development and career building opportunities for low-skilled workers. It will function as a workforce training "hub" using technology to train technologists.

Oregon Institute of Technology

Project Name: Technology Opportunities Project (TOP)
Requested Funding: $1,030,404 (over four years)
Likely Source of Federal Funds: Department of Education; Student Support Services (SSS)

Project Summary: OIT requests funding from the U.S. Department of Education to establish a Student Support Services (SSS) Project, with a primary focus on integrating technology into the lives of SSS students and bridging the "technology divide." SSS Projects provide the critical academic supports necessary to enable students from disadvantaged backgrounds to persist in higher education and realize the dream of a college degree. (Disadvantaged students are defined as students who are either low-income or first-generation college students, or who have a disability.) Nationally, students participating in an SSS project are 22 percent more likely than their peers to persist until their junior year.

OIT enrolls a very high percentage of SSS-eligible students: 76 percent of OIT students are SSS-eligible, representing a potential service population of 1,926 students. Many OIT students are low income. In 1999-00, 36 percent of OIT students were awarded Pell Grants (compared to a 20 percent rate for Oregon four-year institutions, and a 24 percent rate for U.S. four-year institutions). A greater percentage of OIT students (67 percent) receive financial aid than at any other Oregon public four-year institution (average for other OUS schools is 51 percent). First-generation college students comprise 64 percent of the OIT student body (compared to 56 percent rate for all OUS institutions, and 54 percent rate for four-year institutions nationally).

Seventeen percent of entering OIT students report disabilities (compared to six percent at other Oregon colleges and nine percent nationally).

TOP will annually provide services to significantly increase academic achievement, retention, and graduation rates of 220 of OIT's most needy SSS-eligible students. TOP's service plan will succeed because it is founded on research-based "Best Practices" of SSS, including a summer bridge program; a structured freshman-year experience (including a learning community); an emphasis on transitioning participants into the world of computers; intrusive academic advising; strong financial supports; and a host of academic supports, such as tutoring and supplemental instruction in mathematics. The service plan will succeed because it emphasizes creating a sense of community and caring among staff and participants. The service plan will also succeed because of the strength of OIT's institutional commitment. Key OIT contributions to TOP include an ideal facility; a fully-equipped TOP computer lab; and $20,000 earmarked annually toward meeting participants' financial needs.

Oregon State University

Program Name: The Pacific Northwest Institute for Sustainable Natural Resources
Requested Funding: $1,750,000 for FY 2002
Likely Sources of Federal Funds: USDA, USDI, USDC, NOAA, and EPA Appropriations

Project Summary: The Pacific Northwest Institute for Sustainable Natural Resources (the PNW Institute) addresses the long-recognized need for a coordinated effort among the states of the Pacific Northwest Region (Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and Idaho) to develop a regional approach to issue analyses, research, monitoring, and policy development focused on improving sustainable management of the region's valuable renewable natural resources. Proposed as a cooperative venture by the major public research universities in the four states, the Institute would serve as a recognized, credible, and effective point of access to the interdisciplinary expertise, scientific capacity, and educational and technology transfer capabilities of those universities. Through comprehensive multi-institutional partnerships and cooperative multi-disciplinary efforts, the proposed PNW Institute would provide broader assistance to state, federal, tribal, and local governments; regional planning organizations; natural resource-based industries and services; conservation and environmental organizations; and interested and involved citizens in improving the environments, economies, and communities of the Pacific Northwest region. The concept of sustainability articulates the Institute's goals and the regional concept for the Institute arises from the Principles of Enlibra adopted by the Western Governors' Association.

The long term objectives of the PNW Institute will be to: (1) increase economic viability of Regional communities and citizens; (2) increase efficiency in managing, using, and conserving energy, water, land, and materials resources; (3) reduce releases to air, water, and land of substances harmful to human health and the environment; and (4) reduce negative impacts on native species and ecosystems of the region.

The Institute will function through establishing a coordinated network of scientists and scholars from partner universities and collaborating institutions with expertise in the various disciplinary dimensions of natural resources issues. OSU is the predominant public higher education and research institution in the State of Oregon dealing with the health, conservation, and management of the state's renewable natural resources. In addition, major federal research units (e.g., USDA-FS and-ARS; USGS-BRD; USDI-F&WS; NOAA; USEPA) are located on the OSU campus, making Corvallis the site of one of the largest concentrations of scientific and academic activities focused on natural resources in the world. Because of this scientific and academic capacity, it is logical that OSU should assume a leadership role and serve as the focal point for the proposed Institute. The PNW Institute would expand to a regional basis the concepts and partnerships established by the Oregon Natural Resources Institute (ONRI), a consortium of Oregon universities and state agencies recently established at OSU. ONRI may soon receive direct funding from the State of Oregon to develop specific services to assist state government and the public. As the PNW Institute develops along the lines of ONRI, collaborations with other institutions and public agencies as well as the private sector will be sought.

Oregon State University

Program Name: Early Childhood Leadership Directions
Requested Funding: $1.8 million invested over three years
Likely Source of Federal Funds: Federal agencies that support state- and community-based initiatives for infants, toddlers, and children through age eight and their families, including numerous programs in the Department of Education, the Department of Health and Human Services, USDA's Cooperative Extension Service, and military child care and education programs.

Project Summary: To effectively serve and advocate for young children and their families, professionals in early childhood (EC) must possess a core set of leadership skills. These leadership skills are essential in all early childhood settings from Head Start to child care to home visitation services. The proposed Early Childhood Leadership Directions will nurture EC leaders with strong skills in decision-making, collaboration and communication, application of research, and outcome-based evaluation of services and supports for young children and their families. These skills are especially critical now as the nation moves to expand the investment in early childhood and to design cost effective, family guided, culturally sensitive, and effective services for young children and their families. Regardless of program sponsorship or funding stream, development of leaders is critical to the success of these investments.

EC Leadership Directions will pioneer new strategies to develop skills in collaboration, administration, and evaluation among national, state and local EC personnel. Using the leadership framework espoused by Peter Senge (1990; 2000), five core concepts will be emphasized: systems thinking, personal mastery, mental models, shared vision, and team learning. Through participation in EC Leadership Directions, emerging EC leaders will learn and apply these core concepts to early childhood issues in community settings that serve young children and their families.

More than 1,000 new leaders will be prepared by direct participation in this effort during its first three years, and many more will be influenced by concepts and materials shared by the project.

Oregon State University

Program Name: Wildland Fire Science Program
Requested Funding: $500,000
Likely Source of Federal Funds: 1) cooperative partnership with the USDA Forest Service and related agencies supported by the President's National Fire Plan and the Joint Fire Sciences Program; 2) research grant from the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC); 3) special grant from the USDA Cooperative States Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES).

Project Summary: The importance of wildland fire was dramatized in 1994, 1996, and 2000 when more than $650 million were expended from the federal treasury to suppress catastrophic outbreaks. Millions more were spent by state and private organizations in fighting these blazes. In addition, restoration of burned lands and reconstruction of structures represent another substantial expenditure. Many of these conflagrations were featured in network news, and millions of acres and countless communities were seriously affected. Potentially warmer and drier conditions resulting from global climate change promise to exacerbate these conditions well into the 21st century.

Unfortunately, during the past 20 years there has been a de-emphasis in wildland fire science at most western universities. At the same time, private landowners, and state and federal agencies entrusted with managing vast acreage of the western U.S., recognize the need for a comprehensive understanding of fire to improve their management practices and resource stewardship. There is a tremendous opportunity for OSU to become the recognized research and educational leader in the area of wildland fire science.

OSU currently has limited expertise to address these needs. Although several faculty are engaged in teaching, research, and extension activities involving wildland fire, at best it is on a fragmented basis. Specifically, OSU lacks a curriculum to fully cover the subject of wildland fire, and a complementary research and technology transfer program that will keep educational programs on the leading edge of this topic.

This proposal is for initial funding to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary program in Wildland Fire Science at OSU. Funds are requested ($500,000) to provide support for new faculty (2.0 FTE) and operating expenses for a two-year period. This will enable the initiation, coordination, and implementation of basic and applied research projects, and a state-of-the art curriculum. One faculty member could be stationed at the new Central Oregon State University (if awarded) and would coordinate with the Fire Technology Program already offered at Central Oregon Community College. Such a program will integrate the teaching, research, and outreach missions of the University.

Portland State University

Program Name: The University District-Building an Engineering and Science Center in the Central City
Requested Funding: $3 million
Likely Source of Federal Funding: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Project Summary: Portland State University (PSU) and the City of Portland have established a partnership to strengthen the central city and its urban university. The University District is a plan that links the priorities of the City of Portland to the long range development of Portland State University and its surrounding neighborhood. The goal is to develop a vibrant urban neighborhood that includes 1500 new units of housing, expansion of open spaces and parks, increased public transit options, and new businesses and high wage jobs.

As part of the University District, PSU is proposing the development of a new engineering complex that will enhance research at the University. The University seeks to be the model urban university for the 21st century; in order to reach that goal the leadership has determined that investment in engineering, science, and technology must be a priority. Investment in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and in the sciences generally, will serve as a research magnet for businesses needing close access to high quality faculty and students. To support emerging and growing businesses in the high technology field, PSU's School of Business has developed an initiative focusing on the management of innovation and technology. The result of this investment will be greater collaboration with industry and new and exciting research initiatives.

Portland State University

Program Name: The Portland Metropolitan Partnership for Secondary School Leadership
Requested Funding: $1 million
Likely Source of Federal Funds: Department of Education

Project Summary: PSU and its Graduate School of Education is proposing the establishment of a program (The Portland Metropolitan Partnership for Secondary School Leadership) that will recruit, prepare, and support with continuing professional development school leaders for the metropolitan regions secondary schools (including middle schools, high schools, and alternative schools). The goal of this program will be to build capacity in the secondary schools in the region for making and sustaining the substantive changes required to reduce the dropout rates and to assist students in meeting the high academic standards required for successful participation in contemporary society.

Critical components of the work of the Partnership will include the following:

  1. Identifying a cadre of aspiring administrators with significant successful experience working in high-need schools who are interested in assuming leadership roles in such schools with particular attention to identifying potential administrators of color;
  2. Providing a program that focuses on the renewal and systemic change of secondary schools to enable all students to successfully complete high school and meet high academic standards; areas for emphasis include school/home/ community collaboration, eliminating achievement disparities through solid teaching and support for student learning; and engaging students in learning experiences in the community;
  3. Linking practicing school leaders in networks of support and collaboration to capitalize on the lessons learned from successful change efforts and to provide administrators with the encouragement, assistance, and resources needed to sustain this difficult work;
  4. Providing responsive and useful professional development opportunities for school leaders to help them move from novices to experts and from initial administrator licenses to continuing licensure and preparation for the position of superintendent, linking this professional development with the initial preparation programs for new leaders;
  5. Building a research agenda by involving aspiring and practicing leaders, university faculty, and business leaders in action research projects that investigate questions of concern to secondary schools engaging in systemic change, making the results of that research public to expand the capacity and knowledge of best practices of leaders in the region;
  6. Linking the preparation of secondary school leaders to the initial preparation of secondary school teachers, recognizing that leadership must exist throughout the schools for real and sustainable changes to occur; and
  7. Developing strategies for sustaining the network beyond the life of the external resources.

Portland State University

Program Name: Mark O. Hatfield School of Government, College of Urban and Public Affairs
Requested Funding: $2.5 million
Likely Source of Federal Funds: Department of Education

Project Summary: PSU is seeking funding to support the Mark O. Hatfield School of Government in the College of Urban and Public Affairs. Named in honor of one of Oregon's most distinguished and respected national leaders, the Hatfield School of Government is an academic center for the advancement of education and research that fosters the passion for public service, the art of public leadership and the practice of self-governance, and provides a forum that promotes trust, commitment, collaborative dialogue and diversity of opinion among academics, elected and administrative officials and citizens.

Federal funding will be used to support the faculty and students of the School and the School's research institutes including the Policy Consensus Center, the Institute for Nonprofit Management, the Civic Capacity Center, The Executive Leadership Institute, The Criminal Justice Policy Institute, The Institute for Tribal Governments, and the Center for Advanced Analytical Technologies (a joint initiative with the Claremont Graduate University). Among the activities that will be funded are those that:

  1. Support the professional development of elected and other officials at all levels of government, nonprofit organizations, and related institutions;
  2. Increase the awareness of the importance of public service, to foster among the youth of the United States greater recognition of the role of public service in the development of the United States, and to promote public service as a career choice;
  3. Support students of government, public policy, nonprofit management, or administrative justice who have demonstrated a commitment to public service as a career choice;
  4. Enhance the research work of the School's institutes and centers, providing a true laboratory for community organizations and government to address public policy issues of significance to the Northwest and the Portland metropolitan region; or
  5. Encourage a public dialogue about the implications policy decisions and of scientific discovery and current affairs, promoting an understanding of the full range of legal, ethical, and societal implications of highly visible public policy issues of unique importance to the Northwest and the Portland metropolitan region that can also inform national public policy discussions and decisions.

Southern Oregon University

Project Name: Native American Performing Arts Project
Requested Funding: $500,000
Likely Source of Federal Funds: Labor/Health and Human Services/Education

Project Summary: The Native American Performing Arts Project proposes to add a three day performing arts workshop to Konaway Nika Tillicum, Southern Oregon University's summer youth academic camp for the middle school children. It will also create a Native American theater production that would travel the state.

Konaway Nika Tillicum is an academic enrichment program that extends learning opportunities for Native American students in all the major subjects taught in the school systems. Each year, participating students attend a live Shakespeare play, provided through the camp and the generosity of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Currently, as part of their performing arts class time, students work on a production of a Native American story that has a similar theme or thread as the play seen. While the integration of the cultures is important, other performance pieces are often presented: modern dance, Native American dance with modern choreography, contemporary acting scenes, or contemporary scenes adapted to Native America. The production is then performed on the Green Stage at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

Konaway needs to add a three-day performing arts workshop component to the camp so that students will have more time to audition, rehearse and become familiar with the actual play production process. By conducting this component three days prior to the regular camp, students' class time spent learning about acting, dance and history will not be compromised. The student will have a better foundation of the subject, and the production for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival Green Stage will be of better quality. One or more of these productions would travel the state, building the confidence, pride and integrity of students as well as leaving a positive image of the Native American youth.

Southern Oregon University

Project Name: Southern Oregon Watershed Learning Center
Requested Funding: $800,000
Likely Source of Federal Funds: Departments. of Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies/ Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act

Project Summary: The Ashland, Oregon, area faces an ever increasing complex forest management scenario including old-growth forests, a municipal watershed, an expanding urban interface and increasing recreational usage in a steep and erosive landscape. Additionally, this watershed, providing Ashland's only supply of domestic water, is threatened by catastrophic wildfire due to nearly 100 years of fire suppression.

The proposed Watershed Learning Center will be a dynamic place of community cooperation and learning. It is a positive, logical and progressive alternative to the Ashland community's very real potential for losing its local federal agency resources. The Center would be a partnership involving federal, state, and the city government of Ashland, Southern Oregon University, and private and community interests to actively test and monitor strategies of watershed management.

The Watershed Learning Center embodies three main principles. First, the Center creates a shared knowledge base accessible to all parties and future generations. Second, the WLC is dedicated to the free exchange of information and ideas across all disciplines, professions, interests and land ownership boundaries; Third, the Center is committed to learning through a full range of active management and monitoring of the local landscape.

Central to the WLC is the creation of a landscape knowledge repository that includes statutory regulations and agency responsibilities related to natural resource management, a current project roster and integrated Geographic Information System for the landscape with Internet access and reference guide. This common database will serve as a regional memory bank for what occurred on the landscape, when and why. This system will allow all members of the interested community to gather information themselves and contribute to an open database so all parties can monitor projects as well as processes before, during and after any land management activity.

The combination of shared information, free exchange and discourse, open planning, and applied learning would allow our community to meet environmental challenges of conserving biodiversity, and viable habitats while becoming skilled participants solving problems, observing trends, and intervening appropriately in our watershed management.

University of Oregon

Program Name: Brain, Biology and Machine
Requested Funding: $7 million
Likely Source of Funding: Department of Defense Health Programs- Telemedicine

Project Summary: The University of Oregon (UO) seeks funds for continued development of the Brain, Biology and Machine: Integrative Information Science initiative, building on the successful effort to obtain funds for a research-grade magnetic resonance imaging machine (fMRI) for cognitive neuroscience research in the first phase of the initiative. The effort involves raising funds from federal, state, foundation, and private donor sources.

The initiative, which reflects UO's nationally and internationally recognized research strengths, is an interdisciplinary collaboration of biologists, chemists, computer scientists, neuroscientists, physicists, and psychologists that will advance teaching and research in the broad area of integrative information science. It draws together the rapidly expanding fields of cognitive neuroscience, genomics, bioinformatics, optical information processing and computational science. This forward-looking interdisciplinary effort positions UO at the forefront of science and technology efforts in the Northwest and the nation. It builds on UO's longstanding and groundbreaking tradition of organizing research along interdisciplinary lines.

The project was funded by Congress in FY00 and FY01 through earmarks to the Department of Defense budget. To continue to develop the initiative, UO seeks funds for a building to house the project and equipment for the laboratories that are part of the effort.

UO is requesting $7 million to equip the major laboratories of the initiative. This will include equipment for several components of the interdisciplinary research effort. For example, a portion of the funds would be used to continue the development of the fMRI facility. Scanners for high magnetic fields and for animal research are needed to complement the basic 1.5 Tesla facility established in Phase I.

In addition, funds would provide for cognitive imaging equipment and computers for Consortium for Informatic Brain Electromagnetic Research (CIBER). To establish a laboratory for electrophysiological and event-related potential research that will permit the analysis of cognition real time and with high spatial resolution, parallel computational facilities for analysis of the data are part of the request. Also, quantum computing and quantum logic device lab, an advanced laser and optics facility to develop powerful new computer technologies, and a molecular genomics lab would be established as part of this priority, as well as a state-of-the-art facility for DNA sequencing and analysis to support the genomics and evolution of development efforts. Additional funds would be needed for a high- performance computational network for solving complex scientific problems and for visualization and dissemination of the experimental and theoretical data.

Funds for an 80,000 square-foot science building to house the classrooms, labs, offices and computing facilities for the Center for Brain, Biology and Machine are being requested. Estimated cost is $32 million.

Potential applications of this work range from new treatments of genetic developmental disorders to the understanding of the cognitive processes in human learning to radically new concepts in computers utilizing light as the information carrier and quantum devices for the hardware.

Legislative History and Other Partnerships: In fiscal year 2000, the Department of Defense Health Programs began a program with university partnership to establish west coast fMRI brain research capabilities. This was funded at $3 million. The addition of a fMRI to the University of Oregon campus establishes the university as one of only two universities nationwide, without a medical school, to house this important research instrument. In FY01, Congress added on $500,000 to the FY00 request, demonstrating continued support for this initiative.

In July 1999, the Oregon Legislature established the Center for Brain, Biology and Machine to foster this initiative. The center will be the home of the initiative's major research arms: Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Cognitive Neuroscience studies, CIBER, Genomics and Evolution of Development, Quantum Computing and Quantum Logic Device Development, and Computational Science.

The researchers involved are extremely successful at generating external support for their research. For example, the Institute of Neuroscience's Helen Neville was awarded $900,000 by the National Science Foundation.

UO and OUS recommended to the Governor funding for a biological sciences initiative in the 2001-2003 budget report, further demonstrating the state's commitment to this research priority. Further, UO is actively seeking private support for the initiative.

University of Oregon

Project Name: University of Oregon Museum of Natural History Collections Storage Facility and Research Lab
Requested Funding: $2.5 million
Likely Source of Federal Funding: Institute of Museum and Library Services

Project Summary: The University of Oregon Museum of Natural History is in the midst of designing an institutional plan for conservation that prioritizes the University's collections care needs within the museum's overall resources and mission. Central to the operations of the UO Museum of Natural History, and the reason for the pursuit of one-time congressionally-mandated funding in FY 2002, is the sole-source provision of research and curation support to the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, and the Army Corps of Engineers. Much of the museum's storage space is depleted by items found during dam construction on the Columbia and John Day systems, for which the museum has never been indemnified. While the general public, researchers and students are well-served by these archeological Northwest treasures, the museum and its laboratories are stretched to the limit. The museum supports the bulk of archaeological research in Oregon, including much "rescue archaeology" mandated by state and federal law.

The University of Oregon Museum of Natural History is seeking one-time funding of $2.5 million to conduct a major survey of environmental conditions in both the exhibition and storage areas; identify specific environmental problems; set priorities for making environmental improvements; recommend and implement specific solutions for correcting environmental problems; and identify conservation problems specific to particular collections and objects. Given the extraordinary circumstances facing the UO Museum of Natural History, the proposal extends to the acquisition, operation and maintenance of basic environmental monitoring equipment, conservation supplies, and climate control apparatuses including heating, ventilation and air conditioning in a newly acquired/renovated storage facility.

The museum's collections, which are now stored in five buildings on campus in addition to the main museum building, grow continuously through gifts and with the specimens and related data generated by ongoing archaeological research in Oregon. To continue to provide and support research and educational opportunities, and to ensure the security of the collection, the University will be best served by centralizing the museum's curatorial and research activities in one space, adjacent to the main museum building.

PROPOSED BOARD POLICY ON BUSINESS PRACTICES

Oregon's public universities are agencies of the State of Oregon and as such must conduct the business activities of the organization in a straightforward and politically impartial manner.

Consistent with OUS's commitment to the free flow of commerce and efficient business practices, OUS institutions shall not adopt limits on eligibility to enter business agreements or otherwise conduct business unless based on the ability to perform, evidence of illegal activities or other criteria required or allowed by statute or Board rule.

OUS institutions shall report compliance with this policy no later than December 31, 2001.

Staff recommends approval as a policy of the Board.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION POLICY FOR THE 2002-03 ACADEMIC YEAR

Background

It is Oregon State Board of Higher Education policy to approve undergraduate admission requirements for each academic year in February of the preceding calendar year. This schedule is necessary for institutional planning, program implementation, publications, and timely notice to prospective students.

Admission Policy Update

Beginning with the admission policy adopted by the Board for 1996-97, the Oregon University System (OUS) projected a transition from the traditional grade- and subject-based admission standards to a proficiency-based admission standards system.

Admission Policy Changes for 2002-03

Admission policy, as currently approved by the Board for the 2001-02 academic year, will continue without change for admission to the 2002-03 academic year. However, projected transition to the proficiency-based admission system has been updated to reflect and accommodate the implementation of educational reform in Oregon's schools. A separate report on the implementation of proficiency-based admission standards is included in the February 16, 2001, System Strategic Planning Committee meeting materials.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends (1) that the 2001-02 general admission policy be continued for the 2002-03 academic year; and (2) that staff continue to work with Oregon schools, OUS campuses, and the Oregon Department of Education on the transition from the traditional admission policy to the proficiency-based admission standards system.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

Undergraduate Admission Requirements for 2002-03 Academic Year

 

EOU

OIT

OSU

PSU

SOU

UO

WOU

FRESHMAN ADMISSION (Residents and Nonresidents)
High School Graduation

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

High School Grade Point
Average (HSGPA)

3.00*

2.50

3.00

2.50

2.75

3.00

2.75

Subject Requirements - 14 Units (4-English, 3-Math, 2-Science,3-Social Studies, 2-SecondLanguage)


Yes


Yes


Yes


Yes


Yes


Yes


Yes

SAT I / ACT Scores**

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TRANSFER ADMISSION
GPA of Residents

2.00

2.00

2.25

2.00

2.25

2.25

2.00

GPA of Nonresidents

2.00

2.00

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.50

2.00

Admission Consideration for Applicants with 2.00+ GPA and AA Degree from Oregon Community Colleges


N/A


N/A


Yes


N/A


Yes


Yes


N/A

Minimum College Hours Required

24

24

36

30

36

36

24

All Applicants Must Meet Specified Course Requirements

Yes***

Yes***

Yes***

Yes***

Yes***

Yes***

Yes***

* In courses taken to satisfy the subject requirements. Students below the 3.00 HSGPA must submit a portfolio with specified, additional documentation.
** Minimum SAT I scores are not set, but score results must be submitted and may be used for alternative or selective admission.
*** Courses Required: OSU, UO-one writing course beginning with WR 121 with a grade of C- or above; college algebra or above with a grade of C- or above, or the equivalent of Math 105. All institutions-two years of same high school-level second language with a grade of C- or above, or two terms of a college-level second language with a grade of C- or above, or acceptable performance on approved assessment options. American Sign Language (ASL) meets the second language requirement. Second language requirement applies to transfer students graduating from high school in 1997 and thereafter.

B.A./B.S., EARTH SCIENCE, WOU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

WOU proposes to reorganize its existing baccalaureate degree program in Natural Science (with an option either in earth science or geology) to an integrated major in Earth Science, effective immediately. Although Western will be the only OUS institution to offer this particular major, OSU, PSU, SOU, and UO offer related undergraduate majors in geology and environmental sciences/studies. In 1999-00, OUS institutions awarded 44 degrees in geology and 235 in environmental sciences/studies.

Students in the earth science program will receive a foundation based on geology and superstructure with curricula in meteorology, oceanography, astronomy, physics, biology, and chemistry. The curriculum was redesigned by streamlining the existing two options into a single, focused major, as well as making some minor course modifications. The revised major will provide ample opportunity for students to pursue off-campus internships and practica. Additionally, all students will be expected to complete the Senior Seminar, which requires students to draw on information from the full range of major undergraduate courses and demonstrate proficiency in the earth sciences content area.

This curriculum will continue to offer students three broad career pathways: science education (K-12), professional careers in the geotechnology industry, and in government regulatory agencies, as well as advanced graduate studies in earth systems, geology, paleobiology, and geoscience education. There is great demand for well-qualified, knowledgeable science teachers, both in Oregon and throughout the United States. This program is multifaceted, providing the kind of broad-based knowledge expected of K-12 science teachers. Graduates of this program would also be prepared to work as land-use specialists, water/mineral resource scientists, regulatory analysts, or in other professions that connect with environmental regulation and planning.

The proposed program reorganization makes effective use of existing resources and requires no new faculty FTE or staff. Current library and other necessary resources are sufficient to offer this program. Western anticipates serving eight to ten students per year in this major.

This program has been positively reviewed by the appropriate institutional committees. The OUS Academic Council has also reviewed this program proposal and supports its implementation.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Committee approve and recommend final Board authorization to Western Oregon University to reorganize the undergraduate Natural Science major to a major in Earth Science, effective immediately. The OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

OUS MAJOR ACCOMPLISH-MENTS OF THE 106TH CONGRESS: FISCAL YEAR 2001 RECAP

Staff Report to the Board

On December 21, 2000, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2001 became Public Law Number 106-554, encompassing the Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations Bill and the budget of several other agencies. The $42.1 billion appropriations bill included $6.5 billion in new education funding representing an 18 percent increase over last year's FY 2000 budget. It is the largest one-year increase in education funding in the Department's history.

Postsecondary education received large increases in most, if not all, financial aid programs. The negotiated compromise between Congress and the White House made student aid a priority by providing a $450 increase in the Pell Grant and maintaining the highest levels for the other student aid programs. The final budget agreement provided the largest single-year increase in the Pell Grant program, to a $3,750 maximum grant, and would bring an additional 175,000 students nationwide into the program.

The bill provided other student aid programs with substantial funding levels:

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) is funded at $691 million; work study at $1 billion; $160 million for Perkins loans; and $55 million for LEAP state grants. The TRIO program has been increased to $760 million and graduate education would stay at $41 million.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH): The FY 2001 Interior Appropriations Bill gives a $5 million, or 4.3 percent increase for the NEH.

H-1B Visas: Congress passed legislation that would once again increase the cap. Oregon universities are now permanently exempt from the cap. In addition, Oregon Health Sciences University, as a teaching hospital, is exempt from the visa usage fee.

Coordinated Interagency Partnership Regulating International Students (CIPRIS): A proposed rule would have amended eight CFR Parts 103, 214, and 299 to establish a fee that schools and exchange visitor programs must collect and remit on behalf of F-1, J-1, and M-1 non-immigrants. Congress preempted such a move and instead passed legislation that transfers collection responsibility from colleges and universities to the Attorney General.

College Costs: There were no legislative activities surrounding this issue, but it has received some media attention due to the release of the College Board survey and Measuring Up 2000-the first-of-its kind study by the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, a nonpartisan think tank in San Jose, California.

Teacher Preparation: The Department of Education is required to compile and publish the pass rates of individual colleges and universities on teacher licensure exams. Additionally, the Department is required to gather the data from states and is in the process of gathering the information and compiling the figures.

RESEARCH

National Science Foundation: The FY 2001 budget will see a 13.6 percent increase over the FY 2000 budget, which represents the largest increase in the history of the agency. The need for a balanced research portfolio is gaining traction, as evidenced by a move to double the NSF budget over five years by Senators Kit Bond (R-MO) and Barbara Mikulski (D-MD).

NASA: The FY 2001 budget will see a five percent increase over FY 2000. This is the largest overall increase the agency has seen in several years. However, several of the science accounts, while receiving increases, also contained a healthy portion of earmarks, essentially offsetting base level gains. None of the earmarks were designated to Oregon institutions.

National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH will receive a $2.7 billion increase. This represents the third installment of a five-year plan to double the NIH budget. While the funding levels seem almost certain, they will not be finalized until sine die of the 106th Congress.

Department of Energy (DOE): The funding level for the Office of Science will exceed all expectations for FY 2001 and receive a 13.2 percent increase-higher than the President's request. Given the Department's negative publicity over the past two years, coupled with the original House funding proposal, many in the higher education community find the increase astonishing.

Department of Defense (DoD): Basic Research (6.1) will see an overall increase of 14.3 percent while Applied Research (6.2) will see an overall increase of 9 percent over the FY 2000 level.

Agriculture: In FY 2001, USDA will be able to carry out another round of grants worth $120 million for the Initiative for Future Agriculture and Food Systems program. However, the National Research Initiative will take a $13 million cut, from $119 million to $106 million. The cuts correspond to dramatic increases in the academic earmarking present in the legislation.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): The science and technology component of the EPA budget will be increased by $53.7 million, or 12 percent.

TAX PROVISIONS

Higher Education Tax Package: The Senate passed earlier this year a tax package that included a number of higher education provisions including the expansion of Sec. 127 and the lifting of the 60-month cap for student loan interest deduction. However, due to the fact that the bill also created the K-12 IRAs, it was vigorously opposed by a number of members. Because of this opposition, a similar bill in the House never reached the House floor for a vote.

REGULATIONS

Human Subjects Research: The Department of Health and Human Services established the newly-created Office of Research Integrity (ORI) within the Office of the Secretary. In light of recent negative media coverage regarding the treatment of human subjects in research pursuits, special attention to draft CFRs from the Department is critical.

GEAR UP Program: With the regulations, some members of the postsecondary education community assert that the department is attempting to control institutional financial aid decisions. Negotiations in the spring and summer produced no viable resolution and the issue will be revisited between the department and higher education representatives this year.

Information Technology: Oregon universities should be prepared to see a heightened legislative awareness during the 107th Congress regarding information technology advances as it relates to the fundamental operation of higher education. The recent ruling of the Library of Congress should alter the 'fair use' policy with respect to copyrights.

SIGHS OF RELIEF

Animal Test Subjects: The conferees to the FY 2001 Agriculture appropriations bill inserted language that prohibits the USDA from proceeding an NPRM to consider the expansion of the definition of the word "animal" to include rats, birds, and mice. The clear result would have been a dramatic increased cost of animal care on Oregon's research campuses.

Campus Crime: In light of the press attention to campus crime, renewed attention on this topic has not led to significant new legislative or regulatory initiatives in the 106th Congress. According to Department results, approximately 97 percent of 2 and 4-year institutions complied with reporting requirements by the deadline.

Fire Safety: Several pieces of legislation were introduced this year in response to a fire that devastated the Seton Hall University community. Citing what some deemed to be a lack of fire safety standards on university campuses, members of Congress attempted to create uniform fire safety and reporting standards for postsecondary institutions. The measures would have created additional liabilities and costs for campuses. The bills have been set aside for the time being and no legislative action has been scheduled.

ON THE HORIZON

Campus Crime, by every indication, will remain an issue in the 107th Congress. Campuses should expect new Congressional and regulatory activity next year.

College Costs, and the issue of affordability, will continue to receive legislative attention given two recent national reports on the issue. Oregon campuses should have a prepared and studied response to the issue of affordability that explains how the institution helps students meet the costs of postsecondary education.

Fire Safety, although abandoned as a legislative pursuit in the 2nd Session of the 106th Congress, may return next year with even greater scrutiny and better organized advocates. Institutions should take the time to consult with local fire officials, campus safety personnel, and student/housing leadership about fire prevention, suppression, and rescue procedures.

Human Subjects, with the introduction of the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) in HHS, is certainly on the "radar screen" of many lawmakers and public policy advocates.

(No Board action required)

OREGON UNIVERSITY SYSTEM-FEDERAL AID MATRIX FY 2001 APPROPRIATIONS

PROGRAMS PRESIDENT'S FY 2001 REQUEST APPROVED BY HOUSE APPROVED BY SENATE PUBLIC LAW OREGON FORMULA SHARE
(All Sectors)
STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Pell Grants
FY 00
$7,639,000,000




$8,358,000,000




$8,308,000,000




$8,692,000,000




$8,756,700,000
Total increase in Pell funding of $11.6 million (statewide) from $75 million to $86.6 million. The maximum grant allocation per student increased $450 from $3,300 to $3,750.
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants

FY 00 $631,000,000,000
$691,000,000 $691,000,000 $691,000,000 $691,000,000 $10,382,611 will be made available for Oregon students. An increase of $1,051,784 over FY 2000.
Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership
FY 00 $40,000,000
$40,000,000 $0 $70,000,000 $55,000,000 $706,042 will be made available as matching fund for the Oregon Need Grant program- an increase of $166,593 over FY 2000 levels.
ADDITIONAL PROGRAMS

Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants

FY 00 $98,000,000



$98,000,000



$98,000,000



$98,000,000



$98,000,000



0% change
TRIO Programs
FY 00 $645,000,000
$725,000,000 $760,000,000 $736,500,000 $730,000,000 13.3% increase
GEAR UP
FY 00$200,000,000
$325,000,000 $200,000,000 $225,000,000 $295,000,000 47.5% increase
Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)

FY 00 74,999,000
$31,200,000 $31,200,000 $51,247,000 $146,687,000 95.6% increase


OUS FISCAL YEAR 2001 FEDERAL APPROPRIATIONS: FINAL RESULTS

Staff Report to the Board

For the past three federal appropriation cycles, the Oregon University System (OUS) has delivered a memo soliciting the "top three" federal appropriation priorities from institution presidents. Each OUS institution has been responsible for developing the rationale, background material, executive summary, and likely source of federal funding for each of the institution's stated priorities. Participants enlisted for the discussions, and the ranking of the selected projects, have been at the president's discretion.

The culmination of the System's latest effort came on December 21, 2000, when President Clinton signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001. The spending bill included funding measures for some of the largest Federal agencies, such as Labor-HHS-Education. The bills approved in the Consolidated package included several earmarks for Oregon's public universities. As was the case last year, nearly half the projects compiled for the Federal Priorities Notebook receiving a congressional delegation letter of support also received some form of appropriation bill language or funding. In Fiscal Year 2001, System projects secured more than $2.3 million in direct earmarks with additional amounts set aside for brain research at the University of Oregon.

The Oregon congressional delegation, supported by campus presidents and federal affairs representatives, worked diligently to secure funding for Oregon's public universities. Most importantly, several valuable lessons were learned for the upcoming Fiscal Year 2001 appropriation cycle. In response to members of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education, campus "preproposals" for the 2001 OUS Federal Priorities Notebook have been included in the Board docket materials.

The coordination and presentation of a System Priorities Notebook, vigilance on the part of institution staff, and the letters of support from delegation members played a key role in the success of individual campuses.

(No Board action required)

OREGON UNIVERSITY SYSTEM -
FISCAL YEAR 2001 FEDERAL APPROPRIATIONS

INSTITUTION PROGRAM APPROPS.
BILL
AGENCY ACCOUNT $ AMOUNT
Portland State University Tribal Government Institute


Engineering Building and Central City Streetcar

Northwest Center for Engineering, Science, and Technology
The Consolidated Appropriations Act for FY2001

VA/HUD and Independent Agencies


VA/HUD and Independent Agencies
Department of Education


Housing and Urban Development



Housing and Urban Development
Higher Education



Community Development Fund



Community Development Fund
$1,275,000




$250,000



$50,000
Southern Oregon University Library Digitization Project



Comprehen-sive Drug and Alcohol Awareness Program
The Consolidated Appropriations Act for FY2001


The Consolidated Appropriations Act for FY2001
Institute of Museum and Library Services


Department of Education
Office of Library Services: Grants and Administration



Higher Education
$461,000




$300,000
University of Oregon Integrative Information Science Initiative Department of Defense Appropriations Bill Defense Health Program Department of Army - FMRI $500,000 in continuation funding for Functional MRI brain research capabilities


UPDATE ON PROFICIENCY-BASED ADMISSION STANDARDS SYSTEM (PASS)

Background

The Proficiency-based Admission Standards System (PASS) was established by the Board of Higher Education in July 1993, in response to an agreement between the Board of Higher Education and the Board of Education. The purpose of the agreement was to clarify and define the relationship between the Certificates of Initial and Advanced Mastery (CIM and CAM) and college admission. Without such clarification, the two education systems would tend, over time, to be organized around different measures of learning - K-12 around certificate standards and higher education around grades and Carnegie units (credits) in approved courses. The goal of PASS was to create a means for admitting students based on demonstrated proficiency, thereby allowing students to move continuously through the education system based on their performance.

PASS Proficiency Standards Developed

During the fall of 1993, PASS involved high school teachers and higher education faculty in the process of developing the necessary proficiencies, the results of which were presented to the Board in January 1994. After additional input and review from Oregon University System (OUS) faculty and administrators and public school educators, the Board, at its May 1994 meeting, endorsed the proficiencies as the basis for admission to OUS institutions for in-state public school students applying fall term 1999. Subsequent revisions of the PASS proficiency standards and the development of criteria for assessment have involved literally hundreds of OUS faculty, community college faculty, and high school teachers. Annual reviews ensure that the PASS standards and assessments maintain alignment with both OUS admission and implementation of CIM and CAM.

Phased Implementation Timeline Established for CIM and PASS

In 1995, the Oregon Legislature passed HB 2991, which aligned CIM requirements very closely with the proficiencies already developed by PASS. This bill also delayed implementation of the CIM until the 1998-99 school year. The State Board of Education decided to phase CIM implementation, beginning with requirements in math and English for 1998-99, then adding science in 1999-2000 and social sciences in 2000-01. The arts and second languages were required in 2001-02 and 2002-03 respectively, but were established as areas where each school district could set its own required level of student performance.

Given this change in the implementation timeline for CIM, PASS also modified its implementation schedule, adopting a phased implementation to begin with fall term 2001 and continue through 2005, two years after each CIM requirement was put into place. This adaptation was reviewed by the Board of Higher Education at its February 1996 meeting. This policy was further refined and procedures for out-of-state applicants clarified in materials presented at the February 1997 Board meeting. Additional timeline adjustments by the State Board of Education in 1999 delayed the implementation of the social science requirement for the CIM until 2003, moving PASS implementation to 2005. However, the current admission policy for OUS remains that students have the option of using PASS proficiencies to meet certain subject-area requirements in fall 2001 and are expected to present evidence of proficiency for admission in all six content areas beginning fall 2005. This policy was reviewed by the Board of Higher Education at its February 2000 meeting. This extended period of transition is designed to allow high schools to adapt gradually to the use of proficiencies and to minimize the impact on their ongoing operations by allowing them to extend training and curricular redesign over a multi-year period. OUS continues to work closely with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to remain aligned as adjustments are made in CIM implementation and CAM development.

Standards and Assessments for CIM and PASS Aligned

A major milestone was achieved in the 1998-99 school year when PASS and ODE agreed upon a set of aligned content standards that extend from Grade 3 through college admission. Oregon is the first and only state in the nation to have aligned its standards in this fashion. This means that as students work toward meeting the benchmarks set at Grades 3, 5, and 8, along with the requirements for the Certificate of Initial Mastery, they will be able to see how their efforts relate directly to OUS admission requirements. In most cases, as students reach higher levels of performance on ODE standards, they meet or are close to meeting PASS standards. As ODE refines its content standards, PASS standards are incorporated into the process.

As reported to the Board in February 1999 and again in February 2000, PASS staff were working with ODE to develop the means to translate state assessment data so that students might use this to provide evidence of proficiency in specified areas such as writing. Another important milestone was achieved during this 2000-01 school year with the alignment of the CIM and PASS assessment systems. As a result, students who meet the CIM state assessment requirements in English, math, and science automatically earn four out of the ten PASS standards required for admission to OUS institutions. This provides a firm foundation from which to address the additional seven PASS standards recommended for advanced students seeking scholarships, class placement, and/or college credit. In January 2001, the State Board of Education reviewed this alignment and further agreed that students meeting the required PASS standards in English, math, and/or science will automatically meet the requirements for CIM in each of these content areas. Finally, ODE adopted the PASS methodology for judging collections of student work against standards and criteria as a means for "juried assessments"-the K-12 system's alternative to CIM state assessment requirements.

Current Status

1. Moving from Research and Development to PASS Implementation

As reported to the Board in February 1999, a three-year $1.45-million grant was awarded to OUS from The Pew Charitable Trusts for September 1998-2001. This award, matched by OUS and ODE contributions, allowed PASS to expand its efforts to 55 high schools during the 1998-99 school year and 65 public high schools in 1999-00. These high schools, located in 46 school districts, enrolled 63,089 students-approximately one half of the high school students in the state. This PASS network of high schools included an eastern Oregon consortium coordinated by Eastern Oregon University faculty that represented small as well as rural schools. More than 180 designated PASS teachers involved their English, math, and science departments in PASS activities at their high schools. Evaluation results indicated that (a) teacher judgment of over 5,000 collections of student work proved to be comparable across the state, (b) teachers were changing practices and focusing classroom-based instruction and assessment on students reaching standards, and (c) students reported that they were more academically engaged in classes organized around PASS standards and that they understood course content and application at a deeper level than in "non-PASS" classes.

Encouraging results from the entire research and development period through June 2000 led OUS to end this phase and focus 2000-01 efforts on building the capacity for PASS implementation statewide. In fall 2000, OUS initiated implementation by offering training to three teachers each from the over 300 public and private high schools in Oregon. Currently, more than 160 high schools and 82 districts have accepted this offer and are actively initiating plans to implement PASS. Some experienced PASS schools have been designated as "Models" that offer various helpful strategies for beginning schools and new teachers and administrators.

2. Partnerships Involve Other Agencies in PASS Implementation

OUS formed a partnership with the Confederation of Oregon School Administrators (COSA) for the following purposes: (a) to inform high school teachers and administrators about PASS and the benefits to be realized by beginning implementation in fall 2001, and (b) to produce and distribute to high schools throughout the state the PASS Guides to Teaching and Assessing Proficiency. COSA now includes a PASS presentation on most of their conference agendas. An Introduction to the Proficiency-based Admission Standards System (PASS) was developed by COSA and PASS and distributed to 2,500 administrators statewide. Plans for winter 2001 include the development of a step-by-step implementation "curriculum" for principals and superintendents. In October 2000, OUS formed a partnership with the Oregon School Boards Association (OSBA) and a PASS introductory guide was produced and distributed to all school board members in the state. PASS has been included on OSBA conference agendas and will participate in OSBA's winter regional meetings.

Conversations are underway with the Oregon Education Association (OEA) to provide communication, materials, and training to high school teachers who are involved with PASS implementation and the Oregon Business Council (OBC) to collaborate on a communication package. Discipline-based associations such as the Oregon Council of Teachers of English (OCTE) and the Confederation in Oregon for Language Teaching (COFLT) are beginning to make (or have made) significant contributions to PASS development and implementation.

3. PASS Statewide Panels, Counselor Forums, and On-Line Training Support Implementation

Statewide panels composed of highly trained PASS teachers and OUS faculty have been established in English, math, and science to ensure comparability of PASS teacher judgments across the state. These panels met in January and will meet again in June 2001 to examine collections submitted by high school departments who will implement PASS fully across their content area in 2001-02. In addition to teacher judgment, PASS uses state and national assessments. Studies will be conducted to determine the success of our initial PASS entrants in fall 2001. In January 2001, Counselor Forums were held in eight locations across Oregon and attended by over 200 high school counselors, registrars, administrators, and OUS admissions officers who reviewed the PASS implementation process thus far and gave feedback for next steps. To meet the critical need for information and training, the Web sites for both PASS <http://www.ous.edu/pass> and OUS Enrollment Services <http:/www.ous.edu/enroll_svcs_home/html> have been redesigned and expanded. The PASS Web site will offer training modules and scoring labs that may be used by teachers as well as higher education faculty and college of education faculty who are preparing new teachers.

4. PASS Becomes Institutionalized Within OUS

The OUS Office of Enrollment Services is working with OUS admission officers to establish the processes and procedures that are necessary for the period when PASS is optional (fall 2001 through 2004) to the period when PASS is the preferred method of admission (fall 2005). This effort includes investigating options for electronic transfer of data from high schools to individual OUS campus offices; working with ODE on the Oregon Student Record; working with high schools throughout the state on implementing the revised course-approval process that maps courses against PASS standards; and instituting incentives available for students demonstrating PASS proficiencies.

In addition to OUS admissions officers, faculty on all campuses are vital to the institutionalization of PASS. Implications Teams were established on each campus. Composed of arts and sciences faculty, these teams examine implications of PASS for undergraduate coursework; align placement tests with PASS proficiency assessment data; and orient and update other faculty on PASS developments. Most importantly, OUS faculty are directly involved in the setting of performance levels for PASS through their campus Implications Teams. Calibration sessions are being held on all OUS campuses in 2000-01. These sessions allow faculty to verify judgments of PASS teachers on collections of student work in English, math, and science; set levels above proficient for exemplary work (worthy of recognition); and align performance of students entering with PASS proficiencies with performance of students in current undergraduate coursework.

5. PASS is Part of a National Standards Movement

OUS continues to collaborate with about 26 other states that are investigating or developing various forms of proficiency-based admissions. PASS continues to have a professional relationship with College Board and other national organizations involved in the development of assessments common to institutions of higher education across the country. PASS continues to be a recognized model for proficiency-based admission, as reflected in the interest shown by other states and in recent publications and articles. In May 2000, PASS sponsored a meeting for admission officers from throughout the nation, but primarily from American Association of Universities (AAU) institutions, of which the University of Oregon is a member. The goal is to continue to ensure that Oregon students with PASS standards can apply without difficulty anywhere in the nation.

This will be supported through the work of Dr. David T. Conley, who led development of PASS from 1993 to 2000, and who is currently the Director of Standards for Success (S4S), a national project funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts, which is based at the University of Oregon. S4S is working with the 60 AAU institutions to establish a clearinghouse for proficiency-based admission systems and to hold a series of conversations on AAU campuses clarifying what students should know and be able to do in order to succeed in higher education. PASS is the result of such a conversation over the last seven years and the benefits for Oregon's students will soon be realized.

(No Board action required)

UPDATE ON THE CENTER FOR APPLIED JAPANESE LANGUAGE STUDIES (CAJLS)

Summary

The Center for Applied Japanese Language Studies (CAJLS) is a research and development center created by the Chancellor's Office in 1994 and later moved to the University of Oregon. The Center's mission is to support K-16 foreign language teachers' efforts to help their students reach CIM and PASS proficiency levels. Originally focused on Japanese language teachers, CAJLS now serves teachers of all languages and has worked closely with the PASS Project and Enrollment Services to create a successful model of standards-based admissions. Key aspects of this model include: clear, concise performance standards; cooperation and articulation between K-12 schools and OUS institutions; rigorous and reliable assessments; and technology-based assessment and teaching aids.

Local success has translated into national recognition. CAJLS has been chosen to develop the National Test of Japanese Proficiency, which will be the standard assessment used nationwide for advanced placement and credit. CAJLS has also received a new grant from the Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education (FIPSE) to develop a new generation of on-line teaching materials in Spanish and Japanese.

CAJLS is an example of a strategic initiative that reaps long-term benefits for OUS institutions as well as K-12 schools. Established with an initial grant of $500,000 to the Chancellor's Office from a Japanese foundation, CAJLS has since received more than $2 million in federal and private grants to sustain its activities in support of educational reform. In addition, CAJLS staff continue to work closely with Chancellor's Office staff on implementation of PASS and other policies related to foreign language and international education.

(No Board action required)