OREGON STATE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION
MINUTES OF REGULAR MEETING
GIUSTINA GALLERY, LaSELLS STEWART CENTER
OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

April 18, 1997

ROLL CALL

The meeting of the State Board of Higher Education was called to order at 10 a.m. by President Aschkenasy.

On roll call, the following answered present:

Ms. Diane Christopher
Mr. Tom Imeson
Ms. Gail McAllister
Ms. Esther Puentes
Mr. Les Swanson
Ms. Katie Van Patten
Dr. Jim Whittaker
Mr. Jim Willis
Ms. Phyllis Wustenberg
Mr. John Wykoff
Dr. Herbert Aschkenasy

MINUTES APPROVED

The Board dispensed with the reading of the minutes of the February 21, 1997, regular eeting of the Board. Dr. Whittaker moved and Ms. Wustenberg seconded the motion to approve the minutes as submitted. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

PRESIDENT'S REPORT

OSU Visit

President Aschkenasy thanked President and Mrs. Risser, OSU faculty, and staff for a great visit. He said that what he had observed during the morning visit reminded him of why he had pursued a degree in the sciences. Nominating

Committee Dr. Aschkenasy announced the members of the nominating committee: Mr. Swanson, chair; Ms. McAllister, and Mr. Willis.

CHANCELLOR'S REPORT

Legislative Ways & Means

Chancellor Cox indicated that the State System had finished its presentations before Ways and Means. OSSHE continues to press for the items on the add-back list that emphasize, among other things, faculty salaries, engineering investment, and regional access allocation. He thanked all those who have been involved in the legislative process.

Engineering & Technology Industry Council

Dr. Cox announced that Mr. Imeson and Dr. Whittaker have been asked to serve as the two Board representatives on the Engineering and Technology Industry Council. He indicated that the Council has had one formal meeting plus several small group sessions.

IFS Report

Dr. Simonds, president of the Interinstitutional Faculty Senate (IFS), reported on the April IFS meeting. One item discussed was peer review of mid- and high-ranked faculty. While all OSSHE campuses conduct such reviews, they are performed in various ways. IFS has appointed a subcommittee to develop a body of data for further work at the June meeting of IFS.

IFS also discussed the OSSHE recruitment film, which is slated to be replaced with a new version. In the opinion of IFS, the current film does not focus sufficiently on the quality of education and programs. IFS offers the expertise in business marketing, film programs, and other qualified professionals within the State System to assist with the development of the next film.

Dr. Simonds reported that faculty compensation was discussed. While salary is important, another benefit may be a tuition waiver program for children of faculty.

Finally, Dr. Simonds thanked the Chancellor, presidents, Board members, and others who have participated in the Ways and Means process.

President Aschkenasy asked if the Board could be informed at a future meeting regarding the tuition policy for faculty members. Dr. Cox added that it should include information about what other institutions are offering.

NAMING OF LAW & LEGAL CENTER, UO

Summary

The University of Oregon requests an exception to OAR 580-050-0025 regarding the naming of buildings after a living person. The OAR provides that an exception may be made if "the donor contributes a substantial share of construction or if other unusually meritorious reasons exist." The University wishes to name a building after living persons who qualify on both of the reasons cited.

Staff Report to the Board

Officials at the University of Oregon have forwarded to the Office of Finance and Administration a request to name the building currently housing the Law and Legal Center "Grayson Hall" in honor of Jeff and Susan Grayson. The Law and Legal Center was constructed in 1969 and has served the University well; however, the Law School has outgrown the facility and will move to the new Knight Law Center upon completion of Phase I construction of the Campus Development Project, which was approved by the Emergency Board in November 1996. Phase II of this project, involving the conversion of the Law and Legal Center into a classroom facility for the College of Arts and Sciences, is one of the top priority projects in the Board's 1997-1999 Capital Construction program. If approved, the Law and Legal Center will be renamed Grayson Hall.

The Graysons, both UO alumni and long-time Oregon residents, have long been associated with the University of Oregon. During their college days at UO, both were active in many student organizations. Mr. Grayson is currently chairman and CEO of Capital Consultants, Inc., an investment firm based in Portland, Oregon, which he founded in 1968. He has been active with the UO Foundation Board of Trustees for many years, serving as its president in 1994 and as its chairman in 1995. Mr. Grayson is also co-chair of the Oregon Campaign, the University's $200 million capital campaign.

The Graysons have committed $1.5 million to renovate the Law and Legal Center into classroom, office, and lecture space for the College of Arts and Sciences. The total cost of the project is estimated at $5.5 million.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Law and Legal Center building be renamed Grayson Hall in honor of Jeff and Susan Grayson, strong supporters of the University of Oregon.

Board Discussion and Action

Mr. Imeson moved and Ms. McAllister seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

AUTHORIZATION TO ALLOCATE ELSIE SILVER ESTATE TO THE THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT & UNDESIGNATED GIFTS, UO

Staff Report to the Board

The University of Oregon requests authorization to transfer $83,000 of the funds recently received from the Elsie Silver Estate to the Theatre Arts Department for immediate expenditure. The total bequest from the estate is $113,000 and is unrestricted. The University requests that the remainder of the bequest (approximately $30,000) remain undesignated, pending a decision by the President as to its use.

The University of Oregon has received a $250,000 private challenge gift to benefit the Theatre Arts Department, which requires matching gifts. By directing the Elsie Silver Estate bequest to theatre arts, the UO will make significant progress in meeting the match. Therefore, the President and his advisors have concluded that this proposal is the most productive and best use of these funds.

Pursuant to IMD 6.140(6), any individual donation or gift that exceeds $30,000 shall be designated a quasi-endowment. The Board must authorize any exceptions in excess of $100,000.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Board authorize use of $83,000 from the Elsie Silver Estate for the Theatre Arts Department and that the undesignated remainder be placed in an unrestricted gift fund at the University of Oregon.

Board Discussion and Action

Dr. Aschkenasy asked what criteria was used for recommending these kinds of exceptions. Vice Chancellor Anslow responded that the Board's general position is to encourage the campuses to raise private funds. In this case, Board action would result in achieving matching funds quickly. Dr. Aschkenasy and Mr. Anslow both agreed that, at a future time, the Board should consider raising the dollar threshold. Dr. Aschkenasy also requested examination of the philosophical base for the IMD and at least consider changes. Mr. Anslow added that Board rules will continue to be examined and revisions suggested on a regular, ongoing basis.

Ms. Puentes asked why, if the necessary match was $250,000, that the authorization was only for $83,000. Mr. Anslow responded that it will encourage the campus to still raise money.

Ms. Wustenberg moved and Ms. Puentes seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

INTERNAL MANAGEMENT DIRECTIVE ON ENDOWED CHAIRS

Executive Summary

Because of decreased levels of state general fund support for higher education, OSSHE has come to rely on outside sources of funds. Some of this support has come through donor's provision of endowments for faculty chairs. The Board's policy authorizing acceptance of gifts did not reference the receipt of endowed chairs. The proposed policy is designed to balance the interests of the donors in directing gifts with the interest of the Board in maintaining appropriate oversight over employment matters.

Staff Report to the Board

OSSHE institutions have been encouraged to seek external funding to support programs and to retain faculty. Support has included gifts for creation of endowed faculty chairs. Recently, a donor has indicated a desire to create such an endowment to provide support for the presidency of the University of Oregon. This has prompted the Board to review its policies to ensure that it has established adequate guidelines regarding receipt of gifts for this purpose.

The Board has guidelines governing institutions' receipt of gifts but has not developed guidelines specifically regarding the receipt of gifts for endowed chairs. The Board already has in place administrative rules and Internal Management Directives (IMDs) that establish procedures for receipt of outside compensation as well as compensation paid from an institution-recognized foundation.

Policy on receipt of gifts (OAR 580-042-0010)

The Board authorizes institutions to accept gifts that will not result in 1) enrollments beyond those in the budget approved by the Board; 2) commitments of funds beyond those in the budget approved by the Board; 3) commitment to continue support of a program if such funds are discontinued; 4) development or support of programs inconsistent with the institution mission; 5) launching of new curricular programs without Board approval; 6) capital outlay greater than $10,000; and 7) a client demand for noninstructional or nonresearch services greater than currently exists. The Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration is authorized to approve other gifts.

Policy on compensation paid by foundations (OAR 580-046-0035)

Foundations may pay salaries or other benefits to employees when approved by the Board for employees appointed by the Board or when approved by the president for institution employees. Unless the Chancellor authorizes otherwise, supplements are paid in accordance with normal institutional practice.

Policy on outside activities and related compensation (IMD 4.005 and 4.010)

The Board, pursuant to specific legislative authorization, requires each institution to have procedures by which institution officials, and the Chancellor, can review and approve receipt of compensation from outside sources or outside activities which create a potential conflict of interest. Those guidelines are designed to authorize faculty to engage in outside consulting or other activities as long as it does not substantially interfere with their institutional obligations and benefits the institution and the faculty member.

The proposed Internal Management Directive on Endowed Chairs is intended to guide institution presidents, the Chancellor, and the Board in consideration of gifts to endow chairs for faculty members and others. It is designed to balance the legitimate interests of the donors in directing gifts with the interest of the Board in maintaining appropriate oversight over employment matters.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff proposed the Board adopt the following Internal Management Directive:

4.020 Board Policy on Endowed Chairs

Institutions may accept gifts for endowed chairs consistent with the requirements of (1) - (4) of this directive. If an endowed chair is created for a Chancellor, president, or vice chancellor, the Board shall apply the same guidelines. If an endowed chair is created for a member of the Chancellor's staff or an institution vice president, provost, or comparable position, the Chancellor shall apply the same guidelines.

(1) The gift is consistent with the Board's policy on receipt of gifts contained in OAR 580-042-0010(1);

(2) The institution establishes the salary for the chair, selects the occupant of the chair, and makes decisions regarding the allocation of funds between salary and other types of educational, institutional, and professional support for use by the holder of the chair;

(3) Expenditures from endowed chair funds will be paid through institutional accounts, unless expressly authorized otherwise; and

(4) The Chancellor shall approve any exceptions to the above policy in writing. If the endowed chair is one authorized by the Chancellor or Board President, the Board President shall approve any exceptions.

Board Discussion and Action

Ms. Grier, director of legal services for OSSHE, indicated that this policy was developed at the direction of the Board's Executive Committee. The goal of the policy is to encourage donors to provide gifts while, at the same time, allowing the Board, the Chancellor, and the presidents to retain their authority to set salaries. She indicated that the proposed policy built on existing Board policies regarding gifts and compensation, which dealt with closely related matters but never directly set guidelines.

Dr. Aschkenasy asked at what point in time would negotiations be conducted with the donor. Ms. Grier responded that, prior to receipt of the gift, the appropriate body or person (i.e., Board, Chancellor, institution president) would make sure that the gift was consistent with Board policy.

Dr. Aschkenasy asked if Ms. Grier had conversations with the president of the UO Foundation. Ms. Grier responded that she had, and also that he had reviewed a copy of the draft IMD; she did not receive any comments from him on the IMD.

Ms. Grier stated that she wanted to make it clear that the Board policy on receipt of gifts is related to receipt of gifts by an institution. It doesn't bind the foundations. Certainly the foundations may have their own policies on receipt of gifts. The relationship between the foundation and how the money would pass between the foundation and institution is covered by the Board's rules on foundations and by contracts with the foundations. This IMD would only apply to gifts directly to the System. (However, this policy would apply to receipt of funds from the foundations to institutions.)

Mr. Imeson moved and Ms. Wustenberg seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

B.S. IN COMPUTER SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS (JOINT MAJOR), WOU

Introduction

Western Oregon University (WOU) requests authorization to offer a new instructional program leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Computer Science and Mathematics (Joint Major). The Board reviewed a preliminary proposal for this program on October 18, 1996. This program will be offered through the Computer Science Division and the Mathematics Department in the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The program is designed specifically for students desiring a solid foundation in mathematics and in programming/language skills sought by high-technology industries -- and is most appropriate for students who would, at the present time, pursue a major in computer science and a minor in mathematics. This proposed degree is a combination of two current degrees, both of which are consistent with Western's mission and campus strategic plan. Although there are similar programs at the University of Oregon and Southern Oregon University, the proposed program is within the capacity of the institution to offer, is in response to growing needs in the high-tech sector of Oregon's economy, and provides a course of study appropriately situated between a community college preparation program and a more theoretically oriented research-university degree. No new resources are needed to implement the program.

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

The proposed program combining existing majors is wholly consistent with Western's recently adopted mission statement, approved by the Board at its September 20, 1996, meeting, which states, in part, that it is Western's aim to "prepare students to make personal and professional contributions to the economy, culture, and society of Oregon...[through its] core curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences [which] provides the foundation for excellence in degree programs in creative arts, natural sciences, mathematics, humanities, and social sciences, as well as in professional degree programs in teacher education, business, computer science, criminal justice, and fire service administration."

2. Evidence of Need

This program responds directly to identified market needs in the region. Students will need to be well prepared to enter Oregon's expanding computer technologies industries, with special strengths in micro applications for software and hardware. Over the past eight years, there have been nine Western students who have received the B.S. in Computer Science and the B.S. in Mathematics (double majors). This proposed program would therefore institutionalize a path that some students have undertaken on their own -- pursuing a program that affords fluency in the concepts and language of mathematics coupled with the ability to transform the mathematical form into one acceptable for a computer. Of those students who have pursued the double major and chosen to enter industry, all were hired prior to graduation and awarded salaries approximately 10 to 20 percent higher than their peers receiving B.S. degrees in computer science alone. Two of the students went on to earn master's degrees in computer science, and one is currently pursuing a doctorate in computer science.

National need for graduates of this program is indicated by the 1996-97 edition of the Occupational Outlook Handbook, which lists "computer scientists and systems analysts" as the fastest-growing field (in terms of number of projected openings) during the years 1994 to 2005. Further, the Oregon Occupational Projections Handbook (for the years 1996 to 2005) indicates that employment in the categories of computer systems analysis, computer science, and computer science teachers will remain high in the state with an accelerating ten-year job growth rate. Based on a projected growth rate of up to eight percent, as many as 440 positions in the state's software industry alone may be created annually. When the needs of other high-tech industries are considered, as well as the demand for high-tech employees in commercial businesses and government offices, as many as 800 to 1,200 positions in this field may be needed. In all OSSHE institutions, approximately 150 students graduated in computer science last year. Given the past history of graduates and projected trends in the industry, it is anticipated that the full-employment pattern of Western's computer science-degree holders will continue for the graduates of this joint-major degree.

In terms of the present computer science degree, Western is experiencing an increase of industry requests for its graduates and an increase of students in the current program (including entry-level students as well as increased transfers from the regional community colleges and four-year institutions). There are at least two major components that will make the proposed program's graduates attractive to prospective employers. First, the curriculum of this program fills a niche between the preparation of community college students for specific job categories and preparation of undergraduates at a research university, more of whom may be groomed for advanced degree programs. The purpose of the proposed Western program is to prepare students for the current workplace and for the pursuit of lifelong learning. Second, the liberal arts base of the program is responsive to corporations (e.g., Microsoft) that seek graduates having a breadth of knowledge, not only in computer science, but in other fields as well.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

The quality of the proposed program draws from established programs, both of which are long-standing at Western. The computer science degree program was established in 1984 and, to date, there have been approximately 220 graduates. Over 80 percent of the program's graduates remain in the Willamette Valley. Enrollment has been increasing steadily, with the current count at slightly over 100 majors and averaging over 25 graduates per year. Western's graduates are recruited to such major corporations as Intel, Nike, Symantec, Oracle, Sequent, and Hewlett Packard. Graduates also are employed in local software corporations, such as Penmetrics, Statware, CTR, ONCO, and Supra, each of which has multi-million-dollar revenues. For the past four years, placement has been above 95 percent before graduation.

Faculty hold requisite degrees to ensure instructional quality. In the computer science division, of the ten instructors, four have a Ph.D. in computer science, three have other terminal degrees, one has done doctoral-level work in computer science, one has an M.S. in computer science, and one is a graduate teaching assistant. These faculty are invited to consult in such areas as networking, systems design, systems analysis, parallel processing, and distance learning. The three mathematics department faculty hold Ph.D.s.

Finally, students in this program have the opportunity to participate in internships and practica as part of their educational experience. Typically, Western indicated there are more industry requests for internships than there are students available to fill them. Of the students in internship experiences, approximately 98 percent of them receive offers from the company in which they were placed.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

Faculty. No new funds for faculty are required to implement this proposed program. As stated above, ten FTE instructors in computer science and three FTE in mathematics are currently on the Western faculty. The current course offerings in computer science and mathematics are entirely sufficient to support the proposed program.

Library, Facilities, and Equipment. Over the previous three years, expenditures for library resources in computer science and mathematics have totaled approximately $9,000 per year. It is anticipated that additional acquisitions in these areas -- in the amount of $5,000 per year for the next three years -- will be needed, primarily in terms of periodicals. These costs will be jointly covered by the library and the office of the Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences for three years and eventually become a permanent fixture of the library budget. In addition, a variety of other resources available for multi-station student use are presently available (e.g., CD-ROM version of MS Developer Reference, Borland Desk Reference, Encarta Electronic Library, STATS 93, Bookshelf, Alternative Program Language, and Delphi).

Current computing facilities and equipment are sufficient to implement the program. With the dedicated technology fee, student computer resources are on a scheduled three-year replacement/upgrade schedule. Thus, the technology provided to all students (including those in the proposed program) will never be older than three years. Funds in the technology fee account have been approximately $255,000 per year for the last two years.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees as well as the Academic Council.

(Copies of the full proposal are available from the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Board authorize Western Oregon University to establish a program leading to the B.S. in Computer Science and Mathematics effective fall term 1997. A follow-up review of the program will be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

Board Discussion and Action

Mr. Imeson moved and Ms. McAllister seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none. B.S. IN

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE STUDIES - TEACHER EDUCATION, WOU

Introduction

Western Oregon University (WOU) requests authorization to offer a new instructional program leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in American Sign Language (ASL) Studies - Teacher Education. The Board reviewed a preliminary proposal for this program on October 18, 1996. This proposed degree will be housed in the Regional Resource Center on Deafness (RRCD), offered through the Division of Special Education in the School of Education, and will prepare graduates for employment in secondary and postsecondary school settings as ASL educators. Although at the present time no license is required to teach ASL, this proposed program is being developed in anticipation of TSPC approval of ASL as the Basic endorsement in Foreign Language Teaching. This ASL teacher education program is being requested at this time to meet the urgent demand for qualified ASL teachers in secondary and postsecondary settings in Oregon and the Northwest. The proposed program would be unique to this region of the country and require no new state resources to implement.

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

The preparation of professional educators has been central to Western's mission since its approval as a teacher training institution in 1882. Further, since the establishment of the RRCD in 1972, Western has come to be viewed as a major institution for the preparation of education, sign language interpretation, and vocational rehabilitation specialists focusing on individuals who are hard of hearing or deaf. Thus, the establishment of this proposed ASL teacher education program would be entirely consistent with Western's institutional identity and long-term mission. The proposed program has as its primary goals to: (1) meet the growing need for ASL educators who desire to focus on secondary and postsecondary classrooms; (2) ensure that students who choose ASL in order to meet second language requirements are afforded professional, high-quality instruction comparable to other languages; and (3) assist in creating a more supportive and accessible environment for native users of ASL.

2. Evidence of Need

This ASL teacher education program is being requested at the present time to meet the urgent demand for qualified ASL teachers in secondary and postsecondary settings throughout Oregon and the Northwest. Several events have contributed to the development of this need, including the national recognition of ASL as a language, enormous popularity of ASL courses (it has become the fourth most commonly studied language in the country), and the demand for higher ASL language competency among students applying to counselor-, teacher-, and interpreter for the deaf-preparation programs. Further, in 1995, the Oregon Legislature passed SB 475 which (1) recognizes ASL as a language that meets second language requirements in high schools and higher education institutions; (2) encourages the development of K-12 ASL school curricula; and (3) encourages the State Board of Education to coordinate with the State Board of Higher Education to implement programs that "prepare qualified teachers of American Sign Language." Over the last five years, in an effort to address the quality of ASL instruction, the RRCD has offered week-long workshops for practicing ASL teachers. Through contact with these in-service professionals, it has become clear that specific, professional preparation in ASL teaching is nonexistent among the approximately 150 individuals hired to teach ASL in secondary and postsecondary settings in Alaska, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Thus, this proposed program will address the current, specific educational needs of those individuals desiring positions in ASL teaching.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

This proposed program builds on a rich tradition of teacher education at Western and the work of the RRCD. The RRCD was created to meet the demand for qualified professionals throughout the Northwest who work, in a variety of education and social service settings, with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. At the present time, the RRCD maintains M.S. degree programs in "teacher preparation: deaf education," and "rehabilitation counseling: deafness"; a B.S. program in ASL/English interpretation; and three federally funded programs for currently employed professional counselors and interpreters who serve hard of hearing or deaf individuals. Students accepted into the ASL teacher education program will complete a 63-credit ASL major as their subject area, as well as a 42-credit secondary education professional core. This secondary education core, approved by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), provides students with a solid foundation in pedagogy that is supported by developmental psychology and learning theory. The secondary education faculty sets rigorous entrance requirements and maintains high academic standards throughout the student experience. A maximum of 18 students will be enrolled in each of the sophomore, junior, and senior levels; this class size will ensure adequate individual instruction, monitoring, and evaluation. Specific program objectives have been set forth for all students in the areas of ASL, deaf culture, deaf history, ASL literature, linguistics, and pedagogy. Finally, the resident faculty who will teach in this proposed program are all highly experienced in the ASL field.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

Faculty. Core faculty are presently on board. Each of the three current staff members has many years of experience in interpreting and in the ASL-education field. All have served in the interpreter training program at Western in such positions as coordinator for the Region X interpreter education center; coordinator for the RRCD summer interpreter education program; and coordinator of the "teacher education: deaf education" program.

Current faculty resources are sufficient to implement the proposed program. One of the current faculty positions is supported with campus-based funding; the other two are primarily supported through federal grant dollars. These federal funds have been a fixture of Western's resource picture since the mid-1970s and this condition is not expected to change. Further, Western will seek additional federal and other grant funds to build and maintain the program at an appropriate instructional level in the coming years. An additional 0.67 FTE instructional staff is desired the first year of operation, with an increase in additional FTE to 1.17 in the second and third years when the full course of study will be offered. Rank for new faculty will be at the assistant professor level or above. In the event that the expected new external grant funds are not forthcoming, Western will internally reallocate resources to support the program at the necessary level. In the unlikely event that federal funding is withdrawn in the future, students currently in the program would be guaranteed program offerings through graduation.

Library, Facilities, and Equipment. Over the past several years, Western has added heavily to its library holdings in American Sign Language research, teaching, and interpreting. Combined with the materials purchased with several federal grants, the campus has become one of the strongest schools in the West in terms of its collection of ASL, deaf education, and ASL/English interpretation instructional media. No additional financial support is required for additional materials. With regard to routine upgrading of current reference sources, requests will be made through Western's ongoing acquisition process.

With respect to facilities and equipment, the following are in place: accessible office space in the Education Building; videotaping and other media services; duplicating services; computer, printer, and related repair/support services; adequate and accessible classrooms; standard office supplies; and telecommunication devices for the deaf (TTYs). In addition, the School of Education is presently exploring the design and the resources necessary to develop an interactive, multimedia, computer classroom teaching environment. This educational technology, when implemented, will serve as a language laboratory for all students and assist in keeping Western at the national forefront of ASL studies.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees as well as the Academic Council.

(Copies of the full proposal are available from the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Board authorize Western Oregon University to establish a program leading to the B.S. in American Sign Language Studies - Teacher Education effective fall term 1997. A follow-up review of the program will be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

Board Discussion and Action

Provost Hunt reviewed the program proposal. Ms. Christopher asked if American Sign Language was a universal language or if there were others such as Spanish Sign Language. Dr. Hunt responded that he would provide that information to Ms. Christopher. Vice Chancellor Clark added that sign language has international dimensions and cultural aspects -- there are interconnections among the languages and cultures.

Ms. Christopher noted that in the section under libraries and facilities, there was mention of exploring resources for interactive classrooms. She asked what type of funding sources they were considering. Provost Hunt responded that it would probably be in the form of federal grants.

Ms. McAllister moved and Dr. Whittaker seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE, PSU

Introduction

Portland State University (PSU) requests authorization to establish the Criminal Justice Policy Research Institute. This organization would be affiliated with the School of Government in the College of Urban and Public Affairs and would engage in applied research activities for the purposes of enhancing the effectiveness of Oregon's corrections programs as well as providing policy makers with assistance in decision making. Among the goals of the proposed institute are: (1) the development of the capacity to collect, analyze, and disseminate information to meet the emerging needs of the adult and juvenile criminal justice system in Oregon; (2) collaboration with the legislature, and state and local public service agencies, to inform policy, identify program areas in need of development, and locate funding sources to enable the implementation and evaluation of needed programs; (3) serving as an ongoing source of information and technical assistance to law enforcement and corrections agencies; and (4) serving as a provider of program evaluation services for state and local law enforcement and corrections agencies whose programs require outside evaluations in order to meet funding criteria. The Institute will be directed by a (to-be-appointed) senior professor in the Division of Administration of Justice and will employ a graduate research assistant to assist with research activities of the Institute.

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

This proposed organization would be directly related to PSU's urban mission by engaging in applied research on significant social problems and providing information and technical assistance to state and local government agencies. The Institute has been operating on an informal basis to date and has a number of research projects completed or in progress. The research investigations of the Institute have assessed and evaluated strategies related to such relevant community/regional issues as gang intervention and prevention, a juvenile diversion program, domestic violence, substance abuse, correctional institution expansion, and satisfaction with state police.

2. Evidence of Need

The Oregon Department of Corrections has observed the need for a statewide, university-based research institute with the capacity to provide objective analyses, contract research, program evaluation, and serve as a data repository for criminal justice agencies. Significant public policy changes dealing with juvenile offenders, sentencing guidelines, and prison construction -- and the Governor's agenda on how to manage these changes -- make apparent the need for such an institute. Letters of support attesting to the need for the proposed Institute are on file from the Portland chief of police, the Multnomah County sheriff, the Multnomah County district attorney, and the Marion County district attorney.

The goals and activities of this Institute are perceived to be complementary to the UO Institute on Violence and Destructive Behavior established in 1995. The mission of the UO entity is to empower schools and social service agencies to address violence and destructive behavior -- at school entry and beyond -- in order to ensure the safety of children and youth, as well as to facilitate their academic achievement and social development.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

The proposed Institute will build on the work of the informal organization presently in place and will continue to be guided by an advisory board composed of ten members representing a wide range of law enforcement and criminal justice professionals in the state and community. A senior professor with an established research record and prior experience in the field will be sought to provide the leadership and coordination of the proposed Institute.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

PSU has established the proposed Institute as an institutional priority and intends to internally reallocate funds from within the College of Urban and Public Affairs toward the Institute when such funds become available. The University and the College recognize their responsibility in securing the funding to make the proposed Institute a vital organization. Staff to be added include one FTE senior professor to direct the Institute and one part-time graduate research assistant to assist in the ongoing evaluation and research activities. A service and supplies budget will also be provided for. In the first full year of activities, the internal reallocation needed is expected to be $166, 640. The informal Institute currently in place has attracted a wide range of research and evaluation projects. Its formalization of status as a Board-recognized institute will enhance the organization's ability to attract external funds and to engage in a wider range of activities in support of criminal justice policy research.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees as well as the Academic Council.

(Copies of the full proposal are available from the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Board authorize Portland State University to establish the Center for Criminal Justice, effective spring term 1997.

Board Discussion and Action

PSU Provost Reardon reviewed the docket item. Ms. McAllister asked if the advisory board would take a different form once this institute was formally in place. President Ramaley responded that there would be a new advisory board structure.

Ms. Puentes asked if there would be immediate implementation of the institute. President Ramaley responded that the institute is already operating; "it will just get bigger."

Mr. Imeson moved and Ms. McAllister seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY COUNCIL

Summary of Executive Committee Meeting (March 21, 1997)

Chancellor Cox announced the membership of the Engineering and Technology Industry Council. (A list was provided to the Board.) Two people will be added to the Council: a representative from the metallurgics industry and perhaps an Intel representative. Currently, the Council is developing an open RFP process that welcomes proposals from public, private, and even out-of-state providers regarding offering programs in graduate and professional continuing education in engineering.

Referring to the December 20, 1996, minutes of the Board meeting, Dr. Aschkenasy pointed out that the language related to the reporting structure of the Engineering and Technology Industry Council was ambiguous. Therefore, he asked for a motion to add the statement: "The Oregon College of Engineering and Computer Science will be guided and advised by an Engineering and Technology Industry Council that reports to the Chancellor."

Executive Committee Action

Mr. Swanson moved to approve the clarifying language as presented. Those voting in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none. The item will be placed on the consent agenda at the regular Board meeting in April for action by the full Board.

Board Discussion and Action

Ms. Wustenberg moved and Mr. Imeson seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

MASTER OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE OR CONDUCTING, PSU

Introduction

Portland State University requests authorization to offer the Master of Music (M.M.) in Performance or Conducting. The Board reviewed a preliminary proposal for this program on May 9, 1996. Both of these proposed specializations emphasize students' development -- and expression of individual talents -- at a professional level. Performance focuses on competency in the communication of music through the medium of vocal performance or the major instrument; conducting focuses on the development of the skilled professional in choral or instrumental conducting. Currently, students interested in graduate work in music at PSU pursue either the MAT or MST. However, high interest now exists on the part of many students who have goals most appropriately satisfied by pursuit of a performance or conducting degree rather than an education degree. This proposed program would complement the existing Master of Music program at the University of Oregon by serving a population of talented, largely placebound, students in the Portland metropolitan area. The proposed degree is directly related to the urban mission of PSU by serving the vital arts community flourishing throughout the metropolitan area. No new resources are sought to implement this program. Present faculty members now utilized in delivering the MAT/MST degrees will be involved in the M.M. offerings. An internal reallocation of existing funds will be used to strengthen library holdings for this program, primarily musical scores.

(The full program proposal and external review are on file in the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

The proposed program is directly related to PSU's urban mission. A professional program in the arts enjoys tremendous benefits from the diverse cultural influences of an urban center, and, conversely, the metropolitan area is the richer for its public higher education provider offering high-level programs in the arts. The institution's position as a primary influence in the city will be enhanced by the students in the arts who live and study there. Program graduates will add considerably to the quality of Portland's cultural life.

2. Evidence of Need

Portland State University has attracted an exceptional faculty -- both in number and prestige -- in the performing arts. Consequently, the number of highly qualified students in all music degree programs has increased significantly over the past decade. Approximately 40 students each year request information about graduate degrees in performance offered by the music department. Many of these students ultimately pursue graduate work in music at PSU via the teaching degrees, although their preferred option would be the M. M. Some students have left PSU programs when they felt their career options were limited without having the M.M. available. The Department of Music believes that it cannot continue to attract the best students without the proposed degree offerings. In terms of employment, an individual committed to a career as a professional performer should seek a degree program of distinction. Positions in every field of music are highly competitive and only those among the most qualified have the best chance for securing a position or creating a successful life in the performing arts. This program will better offer gifted and qualified graduates that chance.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

The proposed program is assured to be of high quality. All participating faculty members are recognized as expert performers and teachers in their specialized area and are regarded as leaders in the community, regionally, nationally, and in some cases, internationally. The resumes of music department faculty members are replete with references to performances, compositions, and recordings to their credit. Further, high levels of student success at the undergraduate level reflect the quality of present programs at PSU. Among recent honors attained are the 1992 and 1993 First Place prizes, National Association of Teachers of Singing competition; the 1994 Second Place, Portland Youth Philharmonic Concerto competition; and the 1995 First Place, National Metropolitan Opera competition.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

Faculty. No new funds are sought in order to implement this proposed new program. The faculty members currently involved in delivery of the MAT and MST degrees would be the same individuals to provide instruction for the M.M. degrees. An integral part of the instructional mission of the proposed program would be carried out by involving adjunct faculty members who are leaders in Portland's major musical organizations. Reassignment of present faculty will be made to accommodate the one new course in the curriculum.

Library, Facilities, and Equipment. The present music holdings of the PSU library represent a high-quality collection. The Audio-Visual Services section of the library contains the collection of scores and recordings needed for research. With the rise of the CD as the recording standard, the Audio-Visual unit began building a complete collection several years ago. Weaker areas in both book and recording collections are being reviewed in consultation with faculty members in each specialty; an additional $2,000 per year has been reallocated from existing library funds to enhance these areas, primarily for the purchase of performance scores.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees, the Academic Council, and by an on-site external review team. The external review was conducted by Thomas Cook, chair of the Department of Music at the University of Montana, and Richard Evans, chair of the Department of Music at Whitworth College, who visited the PSU campus on December 3, 1996. The positive review found that "much of the proposed curricular content is already in place;" that "increased enrollments in graduate music students should be expected as a consequence of adding these highly attractive options;" that the faculty have "definitive professional achievement in creative activity and proven teaching expertise;" and that PSU "can be proud of the stature of this department's reputation in the state and region -- a prestige assured to be even further enhanced" once this program is implemented.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Board authorize Portland State University to establish a program leading to the Master of Music in Performance or Conducting effective fall term 1997, with a follow-up review of the program to be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

Board Discussion and Action (February 21, 1997)

Dr. Aschkenasy indicated he had recently attended a concert of the Oregon Symphony that had a student conductor from Pacific University, and he wondered why PSU didn't have a program like that. Dr. Stanford, department chair, explained that Pacific had a specific agreement with the Symphony as a result of an arrangement with a benefactor.

Ms. Christopher moved and Mr. Swanson seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, Swanson, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

Board Discussion and Action (April 18, 1997)

Ms. Wustenberg moved and Mr. Imeson seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, Imeson, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

EMERGING SMALL BUSINESS/MINORITY & WOMEN BUSINESS ENTERPRISE CONTRACTS

Staff Report to the Board

Oregon Administrative Rules (OARs) 580-050-0041 and 580-050-0042 require the Board to annually review the effects of these rules as they relate to the prior calendar year's participation by emerging small business enterprises (ESBs) and minority or women business enterprises (M/WBEs) contractors and subcontractors in capital improvement projects. OAR 580-050-0041 states that successful bidders for public improvement projects approved by the Board shall make good faith efforts to "meet the project's goals for subcontracting with or obtaining materials to be used in performing the contract from emerging small businesses." OAR 580-050-0042 deals with similar requirements for businesses owned by minorities and women. All such businesses must be certified by the State of Oregon's Office of Minority, Women and Emerging Small Businesses. Successful bidders for capital improvement projects must make "good faith efforts" to hire ESBs and M/WBEs as subcontractors or themselves be certified by the State of Oregon as ESBs, MBEs, or WBEs. Evidence of "good faith efforts" may include taking such actions as attending pre-bid meetings to inform emerging small businesses of contracting or subcontracting opportunities, identifying economically feasible units of the project that can be subcontracted to these enterprises, or advertising in selected publications.

1996 M/WBE and ESB Contract Participation Levels

During 1996, contracts were awarded for 26 capital improvement projects with a total value of $24,360,185. Successful bidders on these contracts projected that about $2,482,149 of that amount (10.2 percent) would be for work performed by M/WBEs and ESBs. Of this total, the projected M/WBE participation rate was 8 percent; the projected rate for ESBs was 2.2 percent.

Of the 26 projects awarded in 1996, only one prime contract was awarded to a firm with both M/WBE & ESB certification. This firm was awarded a contract for $299,000 for a project at Oregon State University representing 15 percent of the M/WBE contracting projected and over half of the total ESB contracting projected in 1996.

Prime contracts awarded to M/WBE certified contractors in 1996 accounted for three of the 26 capital improvement projects. These three prime contracts, two at OSU and one at the University of Oregon, totaled $1,407,747 and represented almost three-fourths of the total contracts amount projected for M/WBE firms during 1996.

Historical Profile of ESB and M/WBE Projected Participation Levels

The percentage of M/WBE and ESB participation projected in each year since the rules were adopted in late 1990 are as follows:

Year
Total Value Capital Improv. Projects Total # Projects Project Avg. Value Amount of Participation Percent of Participation
1996* $24,360,185 26 $936,930 $2,482,149 10.2%
1995* 15,226,612 20 761,330 1,533,392 10.1%
1994 31,367,051 36 871,307 6,825,232 21.8%
1993 11,890,000 28 424,643 3,863,000 32.5%
1992 7,742,242 25 309,690 692,084 8.9%
1991 54,633,164 41 1,332,516 1,747,827 3.2%
1990 120,000,000 NA NA 1,680,000 1.4%

* The information provided for 1996 does not include any construction contracting information for Oregon Health Sciences University. The 1995 information includes several months of OHSU data prior to the passage of legislation that granted public corporation status to the University effective July 1, 1995.

Interpretation of 1996 Participation Levels

Under the provisions of the Higher Education Administrative Efficiency Act, each campus continues to facilitate its own construction contract and review of contract insurance requirements. The OSSHE institutions will continue to report each project to the Chancellor's Office using a single contract award form. The Chancellor's Office Administration Division will continue to report Emerging Small Business and Minority/Women Business contracting annually to the Board.

Board Discussion

Ms. Foute summarized the highlights of the report. Ms. Puentes asked, since we're using the same process of disseminating information about projects, why are the participation rates declining. Ms. Foute responded that because construction activity is so high currently, it is difficult to attract firms. Ms. Wustenberg asked if there are target rates of participation. Ms. Grier responded that campuses do set a target. Dr. Aschkenasy asked if there is a way of knowing what the percentage means in terms of dollars. Ms. Grier responded that the State of Oregon is working to establish these baseline data.

(No Board action required)

PRELIMINARY PROPOSALS FOR NEW ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

The Academic Council has favorably reviewed the following eight preliminary proposals for new academic programs proposed by Oregon State University (OSU), Portland State University (PSU), Southern Oregon University (SOU), and the University of Oregon (UO).

OSU proposes a master's degree in applied physics, aimed at preparing scientists for the burgeoning electronics, computer, and optics industries in the state of Oregon.

PSU proposes four new programs: one baccalaureate, a master's degree, a doctoral program, and the addition of a fourth specialization area to their Doctor of Education (Ed.D.). The baccalaureate program recognizes the academic field of women's studies as a mature area of scholarship and replaces the undergraduate certificate with the degree program. The master's degree would provide training in the theory and practice of conflict resolution. The proposed doctoral program in mathematics education would prepare individuals to train future elementary- and secondary-education mathematics teachers. Finally, the Ed.D. would include a specialty area to train educational leaders in a hybrid field of counselor and special education.

SOU proposes a degree in language and culture at the baccalaureate level that is responsive to Oregon's high profile in the international commerce and trade arena.

UO proposes two new baccalaureate degree programs. With the addition of these majors, students would receive liberal arts degrees in the fields of women's studies and ethnic studies. These degree programs would recognize the areas as mature areas of scholarship, better prepare students for the changing environment of the work world, and are consistent with UO's commitment to provide education based upon diversity and excellence.

These preliminary proposals are outlined below and explained in greater detail in the supplementary section of the Board's docket. (Copies of the supplementary sections are available upon request from the OSSHE Office of Academic Affairs.)

OSU -- M.S. in Applied Physics

This proposed program would prepare students at the master's degree level in physics with an emphasis on its practical applications, especially those related to work in industry. Students with an undergraduate degree in physics or a closely related area (e.g., mathematics, engineering, computer science) would be served. At the present time, a master's in applied physics is offered by the Oregon Graduate Institute, and the Board reviewed a preproposal for a complementary UO program on October 18, 1996; the proposed UO program would lead to a master's degree in applied science. The provosts of OSU and UO are working with campus departments regarding possible collaborative efforts. Graduates would be prepared for employment in Oregon's growing electronics, computer, and optics industries. The program will be developed through close cooperation with the companies that would hire its graduates. A program of this nature is consistent with the land-grant mission of OSU, which is the leading OSSHE institution in applied science programs. The program will be structured so that a B.S. in physics and the M.S. in applied physics can be completed in five years. Similarly, students in other undergraduate majors in science and engineering, as well as students enrolled at other OSSHE institutions and community college programs, will be able to complete the master's degree in a fifth year. Because this proposed program is the elevation of a current concentration area in the M.S. program to a full degree program, all resources to offer the program are already in place.

Board Discussion

Provost Roy Arnold summarized the preproposal. UO Provost Moseley added that this will enable the departments in the two universities to provide a career path for OSSHE students.

PSU -- Baccalaureate Degree in Women's Studies; Revise Existing Certificate Program to be Post-baccalaureate Only

This proposed program would lead to the baccalaureate degree in women's studies, replacing the current undergraduate certificate program in the field. The certificate program would remain in place at the post-baccalaureate level. Women's studies, as an interdisciplinary field with a focus on women and the understanding of gender as a dimension of the human experience, draws from such areas as anthropology, black studies, fine arts, history, literature, philosophy, political science, psychology, science, and sociology. As a field of scholarship, women's studies has matured greatly over the past two decades, with sufficient breath and depth in the field now to fully support an undergraduate course of study. Nationally, undergraduate majors in women's studies have been available since the early 1980s, evolving from programs begun in the 1970s. This PSU program will place a high priority on community-campus partnerships and significant features of the certificate program, such as integration of students' life experience into the classroom and collaborative pedagogy, will continue. Graduates will pursue a variety of academic and professional goals, including graduate school and employment in health and human services areas (such as counseling, community health, and social work). Further, the curriculum provides core general education skills. No new resources are needed to implement this new program since it utilizes faculty from a variety of departments and programs within the University; administration of the program will continue to be handled by the current 1.0 FTE tenure-track faculty member (appointed 0.33 FTE as program coordinator) and a 0.7 FTE office specialist.

Board Discussion

PSU Provost Reardon reviewed the program preproposal. Ms. Wustenberg asked why a student couldn't gain this type of education without specializing in this degree. Dr. Reardon responded that this field of study has grown over the past 30 years to the point that it represents an extensive body of theoretical material rather than pieces of disciplines.

Mr. Willis asked what graduates from this program could do with this degree. Provost Reardon responded that, like any liberal arts degree (which over half of the students are seeking), the goals are not so clearly linked to employment opportunities. Rather, such degrees prepare students in ways that enable them to better adapt to career opportunities. He added that, in the current world, the role of women in society continues to raise many important issues.

Dr. Aschkenasy stated that "we need to emphasize employability." Provost Reardon responded that increasingly a master's degree is the credential for employment. Therefore, he does not see this degree as hindering students any more than any other liberal arts degree would. He described some of the important work that has been done in the community, such as capstone and community service projects. Such experiences often lead to employment upon graduation. This degree would also serve as a stepping stone to further work on graduate or professional degrees.

Vice Chancellor Clark asked if there was greater concern about the content or about the connection to employability, indicating that in the planning process, they could address connections to employability. However, if the concern is regarding content, those reflect discussions that are being conducted across the country. She noted that the preproposals from PSU and UO indicate that there is a readiness to move ahead, either for students to study at the graduate level or enter any number of social and human service areas. Some employment is related to women and child welfare, shelters for abused women and children, and other social issues.

Ms. Wustenberg clarified that her concern was more directly related to why a minor in women's studies would not be sufficient. Ms. Puentes stated her support of the program, believing that with the high numbers of women in the workforce, this information is extremely important and relevant. Mr. Swanson added his support, feeling it's justified because of high student demand and because the history of liberal arts and the subject matter has been so predominately focused on men. In addition, Mr. Swanson said, "the benefits come back to the rest of us by the work that they've put into those studies."

UO Provost Moseley indicated that these types of interdisciplinary programs in the humanities and social sciences offer "added value" to basic interdisciplinary programs. "These are not diluted degrees or dead-end degrees. They are added-value degrees that will enhance the value of a basic social science or humanities degree."

Mr. Willis stated that, while he isn't saying that he does not support either this degree or the one in ethnic studies, his concern stems from his own experience with ethnic studies programs and his perspective that a lot of students did not move beyond that program.

Vice Chancellor Clark responded that many of those participating in the discussion were on campuses in the 1970s when these two areas of study were in early stages. "In the early years particularly," she said, "these areas were shot through with ideology and political activity, and it was very difficult to sort out the academic substance from the ideological. I think one of the things that is different now in both areas is that there has been a great deal of maturity of fields in terms of the research and writing and the kinds of courses and available literature. It is quite different from the earlier period." Dr. Clark noted that using this program as a recruitment tool to attract women was not the same issue as ethnic studies programs are, which hope to enhance campus diversity.

Ms. Puentes cautioned that using such programs to attract a more diverse student population can unintentionally track students into those specific programs. Mr. Willis agreed, noting the dynamic tension between providing programs with which students identify while not pushing them into a particular program or department.

In addition, Ms. Puentes noted that diversity issues are of greater concern to major corporations, and that there is active hiring in areas of team building, cross-cultural communication, and intercultural communication.

President Frohnmayer indicated that these programs, while in response to student demand, emphasize academic rigor and are "outward looking" (i.e., do not segregate people). "We will not have a program that is mediocre just to appease a constituency."

Dr. Aschkenasy re-emphasized his concern that programs better align with employment opportunities. Vice Chancellor Clark indicated that the vagaries of living in a society that is "unplanned" (e.g., students are not assigned to study majors based on the needs of society), synchronizing student degrees and areas of study with national and economic trends remains a complex endeavor. However, she assured Dr. Aschkenasy that his admonition to relate planning to employment outcomes will continue to be taken very seriously.

PSU -- M.A. in Conflict Resolution

This proposed master's degree program would provide students with the opportunity to gain mastery of the principles, insights and techniques for resolving conflict. Each student would tailor a degree program specific to their interests and needs, leading to an understanding of the various kinds of conflict (psychological, interpersonal, social, and global) as well as the development of a specialty area (e.g., family, organization, environment, human services/education, intercultural/international). Students in this program will be well grounded in both theory and practice, from an exploration of the deepest philosophical issues to hands-on practical applications of conflict resolution. Courses in the departments of philosophy, speech communication, sociology, psychology, international studies, political science, counseling, education, social work, and urban studies will be available to students enrolled in the program. This degree program is consistent with the urban mission of PSU -- as professional communities, neighborhood associations, and families increasingly turn to mediation and conflict resolution professionals to settle disputes. It is anticipated that graduates of the program will find positions as mediators, arbitrators, and violence-prevention specialists; many, however, will be applying this skill to their current professions. Half of the (approximately $85,000) yearly budget for the program will come from state funds and the remainder from private gifts and grants. The University of Oregon offers a graduate-level specialization in this area in its Master of Interdisciplinary Studies program. The two institutions expect to continue their collaborations as planning proceeds.

Board Discussion

Provost Reardon presented this preproposal to the Board. Mr. Willis expressed his interest in seeing the details as this program is developed.

PSU -- Ph.D. in Mathematics Education

This proposed degree program would prepare individuals at the doctoral level so that they might train prospective math teachers in elementary- and secondary-education settings. Students would take coursework in both mathematics and pedagogy; degree candidates would write a thesis in mathematics education, conducting their research largely in area school systems. Although OSU currently offers a Ph.D. in mathematics education, the proposed program would be different in emphasis and provide a balance between study in mathematics and education. While most doctoral programs in mathematics education are structured to emphasize coursework in pure mathematics with a mathematics education-focused thesis to conclude the degree requirements, the coursework for this degree also includes considerable math pedagogy content.

Training individuals to perform research in mathematics pedagogy is increasingly important in our current era of educational reform. This proposed program is an attempt to understand how to increase access to mathematics in K-16 education. This program is closely aligned with key elements of PSU's mission, which requires work on a nationwide urban agenda as well as addressing the specific needs of Oregon's urban communities. A consistent issue in metropolitan communities across the country is the need to promote K-16 education reform, particularly in mathematics education. PSU has five faculty members in mathematics and one in education well positioned to mentor graduate students in this proposed program. Review of the faculty members' collective record of research, publication, and professional outreach to mathematics educators suggests they demonstrate the requisite qualifications to offer a doctoral program, in addition to the master's programs already established. Employment prospects for doctoral graduates in mathematics education are very good (in contrast to mathematics per se); for example, according to the American Mathematical Society, vacancies for 54 tenure-track positions in mathematics education existed at American colleges and universities in December 1996. Interest in this proposed Ph.D. program on the part of prospective students is high. No new faculty are needed to implement this new degree program provided the program size remains relatively small, as presently planned; PSU has placed a high priority on initiating this program and, in recent faculty replacements, has hired strategically to enhance the area of mathematics education. Other resources will be needed, however, to provide support to the program's graduate students and to acquire library resources.

Board Discussion

Ms. McAllister asked if this was a program that the Board should request be put on a "fast track" because there is such a strong need for it. Vice Chancellor Clark indicted that it would be possible given the extensive amount of planning that has occurred already.

Ms. Wustenberg asked if the "other resources needed" would be covered by a grant. Provost Reardon said he wasn't sure at this time.

PSU -- Special Education/Counselor Education (fourth specialization) in the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

This proposed program would lead to the addition of a fourth specialization area in the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree. Currently the specialization areas are Educational Administration, Postsecondary Education, and Curriculum & Instruction. Students enrolled in this program will gain an understanding of the complete lifelong needs of children and youth and have opportunities to learn about special and counselor education services offered in neighborhood schools as well as in the community. It is estimated that this combination of special- and counselor-education emphases will allow graduates to work in a greater variety of leadership positions than if they specialized in either field separately. Graduates will be employed as special-/counselor-education school district administrators; in community agencies that directly serve children, youth and adults with mental health needs; for private agencies/companies as leaders knowledgeable about clients with special needs; or go into private practice in the community. The program is consistent with the mission of PSU to focus on degree programs that serve the intellectual and professional needs of the community. The implementation of this program would require no new faculty or other resources, as the department intends to shift current resources to meet the demands of this specialization area.

Board Discussion

Provost Reardon summarized this program preproposal. There were no Board questions or comments.

SOU -- B.A. in Language and Culture with Concentrations in French, German, and Spanish

This proposed program would enable students to pursue one of three options leading to a baccalaureate degree in language and culture. Students majoring in this area would focus on practical language skills, in-depth study of cultures, as well as international/intercultural communication. Essential components of this program's curriculum would include core courses in the language of concentration, an interdisciplinary course on language and culture offered jointly by the Foreign Languages and Anthropology departments, and required courses in history. The degree program will also require a practicum and/or internship, with participation in a study-abroad program as a highly recommended component. This proposed program is consistent with a central element of SOU's mission, that is, preparing students to "be successful in a global society" -- especially important as Oregon's economy is increasingly dependent on international trade. The proposed program represents a collaboration with the OSSHE-sponsored study-abroad exchange programs in Germany, France, Ecuador, and Mexico, and complements the efforts of the SOU internship program, the OSSHE "Global Graduates" International Internship Program, and the International Cooperative Education Program. SOU estimates that the maximum need for additional instructional staff may amount to no more than 0.33 FTE, which would be accommodated with part-time faculty. The need for additional library and media resources will be addressed, in part, by the Discipline-Based Language Study Grant, which will provide for the acquisition of $10,000 of new, non-literary foreign language material. An additional $1,500 to $2,000 per year in the library budget for this program would have to be allocated, depending on the library director's resources survey.

Board Discussion

Provost Hopkins-Powell reviewed the program proposal. There were no Board questions or comments.

UO -- B.A. in Women's Studies

This proposed program would lead to the B.A. in women's studies, supplementing the current undergraduate certificate and minor programs in this area. As described in the PSU preproposal in this area, women's studies is a flourishing interdisciplinary academic field with a focus on women and the understanding of gender as a dimension of the human experience. Women's studies is now considered a mature area of scholarship and has been an established program at UO since 1976. Student demand is high for an academic major program in this area at UO. Although a similar program is simultaneously being proposed by PSU, the apparent duplication of programs is deemed justified by the different student populations being served on the two campuses. This proposed program is consistent with the UO's mission to engage in interdisciplinary and collaborative undergraduate education. Modest additional resources are needed to implement this new program, both in personnel and library holdings. Personnel needs include a 0.5 FTE office coordinator (approximately $12, 960/year) and resources to support peer advising. Library needs include a one-time expenditure of $5,000 to fill existing gaps in the women's studies collection; a recurring $2,500 increase in the monograph budget; and a recurring $500-$1,000 increase in the serials budget.

Board Discussion

Provost Moseley summarized the preproposal. (For relevant Board comments, refer to PSU preproposal earlier in this document.)

Dr. Aschkenasy indicated that he heard the word "mission" mentioned in Dr. Moseley's presentation and asked to see all the institutions' missions. Chancellor Cox responded that the Board recently approved WOU's mission and SOU's mission will be presented to the Board in May. PSU's mission was approved in the early '90s. The other institutions will be bringing their missions to the Board in the near future.

President Aschkenasy segued into a topic that he believes should be discussed more thoroughly by the Board. "We need to become, over time, more of a system. That's a little tricky because most of you are in charge of specific institutions, so your objective is to strengthen the institution. The Board sees its responsibility in terms of the state of Oregon rather than a specific institution." Dr. Aschkenasy suggested that this topic be discussed in more depth at the July Board Renewal.

UO -- B.A./B.S. in Ethnic Studies

This proposed program would lead to baccalaureate degrees in ethnic studies, an interdisciplinary field devoted to the investigation of the social, cultural, and historical construction -- and experience -- of ethnicity. Students in this program would be prepared for eventual employment in an increasingly culturally diverse world. Many businesses are now seeking employees who are sensitive to issues of cultural diversity, even in an era where downsizing is pervasive. The UO is the only Pacific-10 institution that does not offer a major in ethnic studies. At the present time, faculty in literature, English, history, international studies, law, and theater arts are represented in the ethnic studies area. This proposed major in ethnic studies would complement existing university curricular efforts in this area and intellectually link the disparate but growing number of courses on race, ethnicity, cultural diversity, and discrimination. It is anticipated that a minimum of three full-time faculty (one of whom would be program director) would be required to fully establish the ethnic studies program. In addition, increases in staff and GTF support would be required.

Board Discussion

Provost Moseley presented the program preproposal. While there were no Board remarks after his presentation, for an overall Board perspective relative to ethnic studies, refer to the earlier discussion section under the PSU preproposal for Women's Studies.

(No Board action required)

SUMMARY OF FACILITIES CONTRACTING ACTIVITIES

Staff Report to the Board

This report summarizes the professional consultant agreements and construction contracts awarded, along with projects completed, by the seven OSSHE institutions primarily during the quarter ending March 31, 1997.

Professional Consultant Agreements

Erb Memorial Union, Food Service & Recreation Facilities Improvements, UO
An agreement was negotiated with McBride/Seder Associated Architects for architectural services at the University of Oregon on a fixed-fee basis not to exceed $50,350. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Erb Memorial Union, Food Service & Recreation Facilities Improvements, UO
An agreement was negotiated with Thomas Ricca Associates for consulting services at the University of Oregon on a fixed-fee basis not to exceed $12,600. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Intercollegiate Athletics Facilities Improvements, UO
An agreement was negotiated with WBGS Architecture and Planning, PC, for architectural services at the University of Oregon on a fixed-fee basis not to exceed $738,216. Financing will be provided from athletic department funds.

Long House Feasibility Study, PSU
An agreement was negotiated with StastnyBrun Architects, Inc., for architectural services at Portland State University for a basic services fee of $28,000. Financing will be provided from the Board's reserve for architectural and engineering planning.

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology Feasibility Study, UO
An agreement was negotiated with Church & Merrill Architects, PC, for architectural services at the University of Oregon. Maximum compensation for services is $14,000. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Riverfront Research Park, UO
An agreement was negotiated with Duncan & Brown for consulting services at the University of Oregon. Compensation for services is not to exceed $6,700. Financing will be provided from institutional funds.

Student Housing/Elementary School, PSU
An agreement was negotiated with Boora Architects for architectural services at Portland State University. Maximum compensation for services is $21,200. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Urban Center Project, PSU
An agreement was negotiated with Thomas Hacker & Associates for architectural services at Portland State University to be provided for the lump sum fee of $1,351,321. Financing will be provided from a federal grant.

Vivian Olum Child Development Center, UO
An agreement was negotiated with L. B. Olson & Associates, Inc., for consulting services at the University of Oregon. Maximum compensation for these services will be $1,450. Financing will be provided from gift funds.

Awards of Construction Contracts

Beall Hall Seating Replacement, UO
On September 23, 1996, Emerald Valley Construction, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $92,930. Financing will be provided from institutional funds.

Boiler House, OSU
On November 19, 1996, Ramsay-Gerding Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $171,326. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Erb Memorial Union, Food Service & Recreational Facilities Improvements, UO
On December 2, 1996, Wildish Building Company was awarded a contract for this project. An acceptable Guaranteed Maximum Price will be prepared and submitted at a mutually agreeable time during the preparation of construction contract documents. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds to be repaid by student building fees.

Food Innovation Center, OSU
On November 25, 1996, Anderson Construction Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project . An acceptable Guaranteed Maximum Price will be prepared and submitted at a mutually agreeable time during the preparation of construction documents. Financing will be provided from a combination of federal funds and gifts.

Intercollegiate Athletic Facilities Improvements, UO
On September 3, 1996, Chambers Construction was awarded a contract for this project. An acceptable Guaranteed Maximum Price will be prepared and submitted at a mutually agreeable time during the preparation of construction contract documents. Financing will be provided from athletic department funds.

McArthur Court Modifications Project, UO
On February 22, 1996, 2G Construction, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $195,660. Financing will be provided from auxiliary funds.

McArthur Court Seating Modifications Project, UO
On January 22, 1996, Nor-Pac Systems, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $364,223. Financing will be provided from auxiliary funds.

Milne Computer Center Basement Remodel, OSU
On November 21, 1996, J. T. Stephens Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $348,013. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Museum of Natural History, UO
On January 22, 1996, Morris P. Kielty, General Contractor was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $176,154. Financing will be provided from gift funds.

Student Housing Project, EOU
On July 1, 1996, Michael A. Becker General Contractor, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $3,276,944. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds to be repaid from the consolidated dorm debt service reserve.

Weigand Hall Repipe Project, OSU
On November 19, 1996, Industrial Advantage was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $299,000. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

William W. Knight Law Center, UO
On October 2, 1996, Hoffman Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project. An acceptable Guaranteed Maximum Price will be prepared and submitted at a mutually agreeable time during the preparation of construction contract documents. Financing will be provided from gifts and Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Acceptance of Projects

Autzen Skysuite Window Replacement, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on December 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $116,999. Financing was provided from auxiliary funds.

Autzen Stadium Seating Replacement, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on November 27, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $554,761. Financing was provided from athletic department funds.

Batcheller Hall Parapet Reinforcement, OSU
This project is complete and was accepted on December 20, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $144,476. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Bean Residence Hall, East Complex Repairs, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on February 1, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $929,847. Financing was provided from housing funds.

Book Storage Shelving, OSU
This project is complete and was accepted on October 11, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $92,685. Financing was provided from gift funds.

Fishhawk Creek Bridges, OSU
This project is complete and was accepted on January 10, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $126,069. Financing was provided from general funds.

Fairbanks Hall Exterior Restoration, OSU
This project is complete and was accepted on September 30, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $958,158. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Fairbanks Hall Piping Replacement, OSU
This project is complete and was accepted on December 20, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $161,844. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Hamilton Hall Air Conditioning Upgrade, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on January 22, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $215,752. Financing was provided from housing funds.

Heat Plant Reroof, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on January 22, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $160,825. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Helen Gordon Child Development Center Reroof, PSU
This project is complete and was accepted on December 11, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $106,112. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Howe Field Softball Dugouts, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on December 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $158,963. Financing was provided from auxiliary funds.

Laboratory Theater, OSU
This project is complete and was accepted on October 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $574,563. Financing was provided from gift funds.

Memorial Union Commons Renovation, OSU
This project is complete and was accepted on October 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $2,134,520. Financing was provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds, gifts, and a SELP loan.

Onyx Bridge Lab Modernization/Mechanical, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on December 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $387,916. Financing was provided from grant funds.

Oregon Hall Reroof, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on January 15, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $167,980. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Oregon Hall Energy Conservation Measures, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on February 4, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $810,020. Financing was provided from capital repair funds and a utility rebate.

Primary Electrical Service Upgrade, EOU
This project is complete and was accepted on December 2, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $129,484. Financing was provided from Article XI-G Bond funds.

Pedestrian Walkway Replacement Project, EOU
This project is complete and was accepted on December 2, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $182,221. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Science Building 2 Reroof, PSU
This project is complete and was accepted on December 11, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $183,713. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Dining Hall Service Improvements at Carson and Hamilton Halls, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on January 15, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $187,214. Financing was provided from housing department maintenance reserves.

Social Science Reroof, OSU
This project is complete and was accepted on January 21, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $140,867. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Student Family Housing Demolition, Phase 2, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on November 26, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $132,827. Financing was provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Student Family Housing Demolition, Phase 2, Site Preparation, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on January 15, 1997. The final direct construction costs were $430,197. Financing was provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

University Inn Fire Alarm Upgrade, UO
This project is complete and was accepted on December 5, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $92,844. Financing was provided from auxiliary funds.

(No Board action required)

SOLUTION TEAM ON GRADUATE EDUCATION & RESEARCH IN PORTLAND

RECOMMENDATIONS

Initiation of Ongoing Planning Process

To strengthen the research environment in the metropolitan area, as well as to enhance access to graduate education, a planning process should be initiated by Portland State University and Oregon Health Sciences University, in cooperation with the OSSHE Council of Presidents. The process should address the following questions on a regular basis and advise the Chancellor on appropriate collaborative and investment strategies to address the graduate education and research needs of the metropolitan area.

Traditional Advanced Degrees

Citizens of the Portland metro area have only limited access to traditional doctorates in the arts and sciences unless they are able and willing to drive to Eugene or Corvallis to obtain them. It is in the interest of the metropolitan region to facilitate access to traditional graduate programs currently offered outside the metro area in order to expand the intellectual capital of the region. This can be accomplished through modifications in existing graduate policies of the OHSU, PSU, OSU, and UO regarding residency sites, exchange of credits, and the supervision of advanced work by faculty members in the metro area, especially at the doctoral level. These partnerships may be extended to WSU if current discussion about reciprocity between the states of Oregon and Washington are concluded successfully. Such policies would permit a resident of the metropolitan region to engage in doctoral study with faculty in the region and would not require the authorization of new degree-granting authority.

Principles for Investing in Graduate/Research Capacity in the Portland Metropolitan Area

An investment strategy must be developed that sustains and expands the current production of advanced degrees in the Portland metro area at PSU to serve the existing needs of the public schools, the public sector, and the private sector. At the same time, additional investments must be made to serve the rapidly growing needs of the private sector for professional and managerial personnel and to address the demands created by statewide implementation of educational reform as well as to foster the diversification and growth of the Oregon economy through support for safe communities, an excellent educational system, protection of the unique quality of the Oregon environment, and effective and efficient social services.

Criteria for Evaluating Proposals for Enhancing Existing Graduate Programs or Introducing New Ones in the Portland Metropolitan Area

Demand

Quality

Partnerships

Goal Alignment

Sponsorship

Cost-Effective

Context

Board Discussion

President Ramaley introduced the report of the Solution Team by commenting that the report is "still a work in progress." She reviewed the Chancellor's charge to the Team and highlighted the findings and recommendations. Dr. Ramaley indicated that there was uniform support for all aspects of the report.

Mr. Swanson reminded the Board that he had served as the Board's liaison on the Team and that he had written a letter dated April 14, 1997, commenting on several aspects of the report. Continuing, Mr. Swanson indicated that "the Team was on a fast track and did not have the opportunity to thoroughly discuss disagreements. The real issue for me is that we have to face whether or not we (the Board) are going to be able to infuse enough money into PSU to permit it to meet all of the demands that are on it as a regional institution. It doesn't seem likely that we will ever have the resources to do this and so we are left with looking at other strategies.

"My own preference would be that I think we should have a System graduate center in the PSU district that should be open to Ph.D. programs from all of the institutions, and that there ought to be cooperation with regard to (and obviously with System guidance) who should be there. I am concerned with the possibility of the report being weighted too heavily in terms of this being a regional problem; that PSU is the resident urban university with an urban mission; and that the solution is to pour the resources into PSU to address all of these problems. I just wanted to indicate that there were areas of concern and I don't consider it to be a finished product."

Dr. Ramaley responded that there was no intention of this being a PSU report. "The entire process here is designed to create a planning mechanism that identifies the needs of the region and then identifies the best OSSHE response to it. What I'm talking about is a collaborative strategy in which the institutions together develop strategies that we then bring to the Board where appropriate, either for additional resources to mount collaborative efforts or new degree programs. I see no reason why PSU, OSU, and the UO should be operating independent of each other. The point is to do so within the framework of the needs of the region, as defined by the region itself, through a model by which the Board is able to see where it wishes to place investment emphasis."

Ms. Christopher asked for clarification on what is meant when an "institution is a broker for a program that originates from another institution." President Ramaley responded that "brokering means to facilitate in whatever way is important for that program. In some cases it might include faculty participating in the program. In others, it might include providing an environment for the faculty from the institution that is delivering the program.

"Collaboration is, at the very lowest level, being aware of each other's presence. At the second level, you begin to facilitate each other's efforts and add value. At the third level, you begin to link up strengths in strategic directions with alliances."

Mr. Willis indicated that the "challenge for all of us is to think more in a System way rather than as individuals. It may be premature to start trying to visualize the exact model because my sense is we are at the beginning of a conversation about it, not the end. I would like to keep this open and explore further what the concept of collaboration really means and what it can mean in the context of a System and not separate institutions."

(No Board action required)

SOLUTION TEAM ON GRADUATE EDUCATION & RESEARCH

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Charge to the Solution Team: Chancellor Cox charged the Solution Team to address "greater critical mass in strategically needed graduate education and research programs key to Oregon's future through investment and consolidation." Therefore, our work focused on the relationship of research and graduate education to the needs of Oregon's economy and did not address other aspects of research and graduate education. (The text of the Chancellor's charge is in Appendix A of the full report.)

Membership of the Solution Team: The members of the Solution Team were drawn from a cross section of Oregon's industry sectors: natural resources, technology, finance, health care, professional services, and higher education. (Members of the Team and their affiliations are shown in Appendix B of the full report.)

Content of this report: The full report contains an introductory section to provide the reader with an overview of its context, findings of the Solution Team, recommendations, and appendices with supporting data and references. There is much that is very good, indeed excellent, in our research and graduate programs but the focus of this report is on the areas that need further attention.

MAJOR FINDINGS

Transformation of Oregon's economy: Oregon is in the midst of a major economic and social transformation, with its economy increasingly dependent upon high-quality graduate education, applied research, technology transfer, and continuing professional education to stay competitive in the global economy. There have been adjustments at the margin within higher education, but there have not been transforming changes in the mix of degrees produced, the nature of continuing education programs, the amount of applied research and technology transfer, or the system of governance.

Increasing importance of forecasting industry trends: Accurate forecasting is critical to the System's ability to adjust the mix of university programs and degree production. We believe that higher education must develop an on-going capability to forecast industry trends that affect higher education in order to be responsive to the marketplace of the future. The System must incorporate, in its forecasting, the needs of emerging growth companies and industries that, although currently small, will be of greater importance to Oregon's economy in the future.

Growing demand for managerial and professional degrees in the private sector: Oregon businesses have created tens of thousands of new professional and managerial jobs over the past decade, but Oregon's public colleges and universities have not increased degree production correspondingly to meet this need. As a result, Oregon's companies have had to rely on out-of-state recruiting, despite higher cost and shrinking supply caused by the turnaround in California's economy. If Oregon's universities do not respond, the growth of the private sector in both mature and emerging businesses will be curtailed.

Growing demand for graduate-level continuing education: Professionals and managers must stay current in fields that are changing rapidly. This has created a huge market for professional continuing education to which higher education in Oregon has not yet responded. Oregon's colleges and universities should be the "preferred providers" of professional continuing education for Oregon companies, and if they lack the expertise within the institution, our campuses should serve as brokers for cutting-edge programs.

Criticality of research and innovation: Oregon's colleges and universities rank fourth highest in the nation in contracts and grants per faculty member. However, Oregon is deficient in developing close relationships between university research and industry research and development (R&D). If the levels of applied research and technology transfer at our universities do not increase substantially, Oregon corporations will site R&D elsewhere, many entrepreneurs will choose to start their R&D-intensive companies elsewhere, and corporations in other states will not site R&D facilities in Oregon. All of these decisions deprive Oregon of high-wage, stable jobs and payroll.

Increasing the priority of research and graduate education: The private sector wants and deserves high-quality research capability, graduate education and continuing education that addresses its needs. These needs are in conflict with the State Legislature's primary interest, which has been to teach more undergraduates as inexpensively as possible. The Solution Team supports new investments, in addition to reallocations, on the condition that funding is specifically targeted, accountable, and responsive to the economic and social changes in Oregon.

Enriching the definition of educational quality: The Solution Team believes that the focus should be on continuous quality improvement in all educational programs, which implies an emphasis on outcome-based measures. Programs should be subject to rigorous review on a regular basis. Students should be held to high standards both in knowledge of the discipline and competencies in problem solving, critical thinking, communications, and other behavioral skills. The Team urges inclusion of these behavioral competencies in every aspect of curriculum, as well as the expansion of interdisciplinary programs and the use of innovative approaches to educational delivery. Performance measures should also be instrumental to the way campuses are funded.

Restructuring higher education governance in Oregon: There has been a fundamental transformation in the way Oregon colleges and universities are financed in the latter half of the 20th century. Whereas the State once provided most of the budget, today the State General Fund represents less than 30 percent of higher education's total revenues. However, there has not been a corresponding re-engineering of the system of governance to encourage entrepreneurism and to produce greater flexibility and responsiveness. With the passage of Senate Bill 271 in 1995, the State System was granted some additional flexibility but the Higher Education Administrative Efficiency Act did not go far enough. If higher education is to become an asset in a knowledge-based economy, there must be fewer constraints on the State System and greater flexibility for the campuses in pricing and program decisions.

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS

The full report contains 14 recommendations and supporting rationale in six general categories: Demand and Resources; Continuing Education; Quality of Graduate Education; Research; Communications; and Decision-Making Flexibility. The key initiatives recommended to the Chancellor by the Solution Team are:

Transform key aspects of graduate education, continuing professional education, research, technology transfer, and governance to be better aligned with Oregon's social and economic transformation. Oregon's colleges and universities have labored under the constraints of limited funding while delivering on their traditional missions. Now, with the transformation of Oregon's economy at the end of the 20th century, the missions of higher education are broader and more central to the state's future. There has been a fundamental shift in the ways Oregon colleges and universities are funded, but other key aspects have not been transformed to match the new realities. While recognizing and retaining that which is working well, there must be transforming changes in the mix of degrees produced, the delivery of continuing education programs, the amount of applied research, the expansion of technology transfer, and the effectiveness of governance if higher education is to be a more valuable asset to the citizens of the state.

Establish a strategic marketing function to analyze trends, forecast demand, and conduct targeted market research. We urge implementation of a systematic process for continuous assessment of the current and emerging market demand for graduate-level education and research, in collaboration with other public and private organizations. Use strategic marketing to improve communications between higher education and its constituencies -- from the targeted use of advisory boards in specific disciplines to increasing general public understanding of the importance of graduate education and research and its relevance to their lives. Oregon's priorities must not be limited to teaching more undergraduates at the lowest possible cost.

Respond to the growing demand for managerial and professional degrees in the private sector. Targeted investments should be made in specific programs to increase degree production in areas crucial to Oregon's economy. Presidents, provosts, deans, and faculty should structure academic programs around preparing students to become excellent citizens, employees, communicators, innovators, and leaders.

Expand and strengthen continuing education so that it will meet the needs of employers and prospective students statewide, including marketable content, teaching technology, pricing, and location. Encourage free-market competition and responsiveness. Establish monetary and non-monetary incentives for the full participation of regular faculty in continuing education, and make full use of strategic alliances and educational brokering.

Appoint and empower a high-level Science and Technology Council with strong representation from both employers and academic institutions. Charge the Council to move forward in building communication bridges between academe and business, inventory research opportunities, refine research guidelines, host symposia, facilitate technology transfer, and develop fund sources for research. Encourage the university presidents to hire more faculty with applied research interests. Expand technology transfer offices and research parks. Create the ability for universities to take an equity position in startups based upon faculty research. Acknowledge the instrumental role that research plays in the quality of education at all levels, as well as the importance of generating new knowledge to the vitality of Oregon in the global economy.

Upgrade the quality of education by using rigorous, outcome-oriented standards for measuring student competencies, in both disciplinary knowledge and behavioral skills.

Increase flexibility for the State System and the campuses. The Solution Team recommends to the Governor's Task Force on Higher Education and the Economy that it propose ways to reduce constraints on the State System and create greater flexibility for the campuses in pricing and program decisions. The Governor's Task Force should seriously consider the models developed by OHSU, OPB, and universities in other states as alternatives to the present centralized State System and create greater autonomy for one or more campuses, including the possibility of independence from the State System.

CONCLUSION

In short, the Solution Team on Research and Graduate Education finds that incremental improvements, at the margin, are not sufficient to prepare higher education to meet the economic and social needs of Oregon for the century that is nearly upon us. We strongly urge the Chancellor, the State Board of Higher Education, the Governor, the legislature, and the Governor's Task Force to take bold action on the recommendations in this report.

Board Discussion

UO President Frohnmayer and Mr. Duane Schulz, president of Now Software, presented the report of the Solution Team. Ms. Wustenberg asked Mr. Schulz to address industry's monetary support of these recommendations. Mr. Schulz responded that he expects industry would be happy (and should be expected) to pay for continuing education that it requests of higher education.

Dr. Aschkenasy pointed out that one of the essential conflicts in this area is the rate of change. "It seems to me that higher education, by its nature, is never going to be on that kind of track. It seems to me we need to emphasize the skills section and hope industry fills in the knowledge blanks, because the knowledge base seems to be changing so rapidly that I don't think we're going to be able to handle that." Mr. Schulz responded that the higher education as traditionally executed in most states certainly can't match the rapid rate of speed, and there will be portions that it never can. However, that is why the forecasting piece of the report is so critical. Mr. Schulz encouraged the Board to not assume there is not enough flexibility, but rather look to building more flexibility to narrow the gaps. President Frohnmayer added that the Solution Team was not trying to recommend specific programs, but rather direct thinking strategically "to make sure we are brokering effectively the continuing, on-the-job, lifelong learning aspects of what is needed by these rapidly growing and evolving industrial sectors."

Mr. Imeson commented on governance "as something worth looking at as we move through time, not so much as the product of any one of the solution teams, but rather how do we do things in a way so that we are responsive?" Dr. Aschkenasy indicated that the issue of quality remains challenging within expected funding levels. Consequently, he believes that becoming more of a system "means trying to figure out how we can be very good at everything at least somewhere, and maybe deliver that by cable everywhere else." President Frohnmayer suggested a strategy that has worked well in the past that accomplishes those objectives -- the Centers of Excellence. Such targeted investments still allow the campuses flexibility to make decisions about those investments.

(No Board action required)

INTRODUCTION, W. ROBINSON

Vice Chancellor Anslow introduced Ms. Wendy Robinson, who is the attorney-in-charge of the education section of the Department of Justice. Ms. Robinson will be attending the Board meetings.

ITEMS FROM BOARD MEMBERS

President Aschkenasy postponed the two Academic Affairs reports until the May meeting. Several Board members thanked President and Mrs. Risser for a wonderful and informative visit.

ADJOURNMENT

The Board meeting adjourned at 3:10 p.m.

Virginia L. Thompson, Secretary of the Board

Herbert Aschkenasy, President of the Board